print barcode c# / Turtletron: Build Your Own Robotic Turtle in Software

Generation USS Code 39 in Software / Turtletron: Build Your Own Robotic Turtle

7 / Turtletron: Build Your Own Robotic Turtle
ANSI/AIM Code 39 Maker In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in Software applications.
Code39 Recognizer In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
FIGURE 717
Making Code 39 In C#.NET
Using Barcode creator for .NET framework Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in VS .NET applications.
Code 39 Full ASCII Creation In .NET
Using Barcode printer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 39 image in ASP.NET applications.
Completed SRF04 connector wire
Generating Code 3/9 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode maker for .NET framework Control to generate, create Code39 image in .NET framework applications.
Generating ANSI/AIM Code 39 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode creator for VS .NET Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in .NET applications.
To secure the ultrasonic ranger to the robot, a housing to mount the unit will be fabricated Use Figure 718 as a guide to cut, drill, and bend the housing, using 1/16-inch thick aluminum Drill the mounting hole with a 5/32-inch drill bit The aluminum can be bent on the edge of a table by hand or in a table vise Figure 719 shows the finished housing so that you can get an idea of how the aluminum should be bent Next, place the ranger unit inside the housing at the front and secure it in place by tightening the aluminum around the circuit board by hand Apply a small amount of hot glue on the inside at the corners where the circuit board and aluminum housing meet This will ensure that the circuit board does not move out of position
GS1 128 Generator In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in Software applications.
Bar Code Printer In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
Amphibionics
Drawing Code39 In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in Software applications.
Generating GTIN - 13 In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create GTIN - 13 image in Software applications.
FIGURE 718
Generate Data Matrix ECC200 In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in Software applications.
GS1 - 12 Creator In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create UPC-A image in Software applications.
Cutting, drilling, and bending guide for the SRF04 housing
Print USPS PLANET Barcode In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create USPS Confirm Service Barcode image in Software applications.
Data Matrix Maker In Java
Using Barcode generation for BIRT Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in BIRT reports applications.
7 / Turtletron: Build Your Own Robotic Turtle
Creating Barcode In Java
Using Barcode generator for Android Control to generate, create bar code image in Android applications.
Bar Code Generator In VS .NET
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create bar code image in ASP.NET applications.
FIGURE 719
Code 128 Code Set C Reader In Visual C#
Using Barcode scanner for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
UPC-A Creator In Java
Using Barcode printer for Android Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 2 image in Android applications.
Finished SRF04 housing
EAN13 Reader In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode reader for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
EAN128 Creation In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create GS1 128 image in Java applications.
Figure 720 shows the SRF04 ranger mounted in the housing with the jumper wire plugged into the header connector Use 1/16-inch thick aluminum stock to construct the neck mount that will connect the ranger housing to the robot body Follow the cutting, bending, and drilling guide in Figure 721 When the neck mount is completed, attach it to the front of the robot with a 6/32-inch 1/2-inch machine screw and locking nut, as shown in Figure 722 Note that the 1-1/2 inch section of the neckpiece is attached to the robot base Attach the ultrasonic ranger housing to the neck using a 6/32-inch 1/2-inch machine screw and locking nut
Amphibionics
FIGURE 720
SRF04 ranger mounted in housing with connector wire attached
FIGURE 721
Cutting, bending, and drilling guide for neck mount
7 / Turtletron: Build Your Own Robotic Turtle
FIGURE 722
Neck mount and sonar ranger attached to Turtletron s body
Attaching the antenna to the RF module Locate the 6-3/4 inch whip antenna and strip 1/2-inch of the insulator and shielding material from the connector wire Drill a hole in the second Frisbee, toward the edge, using a 1/4-inch bit Mount the whip antenna to the Frisbee by feeding the connector lead through the hole and then fastening the mounting nut Solder the wire to the antenna mount area on the back of the Lynx RXM-433-LC-S receiver module Bend the pins on the receiver module 90 degrees downward, if this was not done earlier in 6 The finished top cover with the antenna and receiver module attached is shown in Figure 723
Amphibionics
FIGURE 723
Antenna and receiver module attached to top cover
Now that all of the components are in place, it is time to wire everything together Use the diagram in Figure 724 to connect all of the components to the main controller board Drill a 5/32-inch hole in the base in front of each of the motors to feed the motor wires through to the controller board Plug the RF receiver module into the 4-connector female header on the controller board Attach the top cover with the antenna toward the back of the robot The top cover should fit snugly on the four aluminum cover support pieces Figure 725 shows the robot with all of the components and batteries connected to the main controller board Attach a fresh 9-volt battery and a 6-volt battery pack containing four AA batteries to the proper battery clips, as indicated in Figure 724
7 / Turtletron: Build Your Own Robotic Turtle
In the next section, we will program the PIC 16F84 to control the motors, interpret the information from the radio receiver module, and obtain distance measurements from the sonar ranger for obstacle avoidance and room mapping The final experiment will be to add an optical shaft encoder so that the robot will be able to keep track of the distance that it has traveled This will also be necessary when the robot is creating maps of its surrounding environment
FIGURE 724
Turtletron wiring diagram
Amphibionics
FIGURE 725
Turtletron with all components attached
The Remote Control Transmitter
The first objective will be to control Turtletron s differential drive, using the remote control transmitter that was built in 6 The hand held remote control device uses an analog X and Y axis control stick as the input to two analog-to-digital converters residing on a PIC 16C71 To make the project easier, we will not change any of the programming for the remote control transmitter If you wish to create another remote control, follow the instructions in chapter 6 To make Turtletron respond only to the second remote control, simply change the qualifier in the serial transmit and receive code of the robot and transmitter The schematic for the transmitter remote control is shown in Figure 726 The circuit functions by using a PIC 16C71 to monitor the position of the analog control stick and then send serial commands to the transmitter module When the control stick moves along the X and Y axis, the resistance values of two 100K potentiometers change proportionally The control stick and the two attached poten298
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.