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Part I:
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The C# Language
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There is one point to remember about using a catch-all catch: It must be the last catch clause in the catch sequence
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NOTE In the vast majority of cases you should not use the catch all handler as a means of dealing
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with exceptions It is normally better to deal individually with the exceptions that your code can generate The inappropriate use of the catch all handler can lead to situations in which errors that would otherwise be noticed during testing are masked It is also difficult to correctly handle all types of exceptions with a single handler That said, a catch all handler might be appropriate in certain specialized circumstances, such as in a runtime code analysis tool
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Nesting try Blocks
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One try block can be nested within another An exception generated within the inner try block that is not caught by a catch associated with that try is propagated to the outer try block For example, here the IndexOutOfRangeException is not caught by the inner try block, but by the outer try:
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// Use a nested try block using System; class NestTrys { static void Main() { // Here, numer is longer than denom int[] numer = { 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512 }; int[] denom = { 2, 0, 4, 4, 0, 8 }; try { // outer try for(int i=0; i < numerLength; i++) { try { // nested try ConsoleWriteLine(numer[i] + " / " + denom[i] + " is " + numer[i]/denom[i]); } catch (DivideByZeroException) { ConsoleWriteLine("Can't divide by Zero!"); } } } catch (IndexOutOfRangeException) { ConsoleWriteLine("No matching element found"); ConsoleWriteLine("Fatal error -- program terminated"); } } }
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The output from the program is shown here:
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4 / 2 is 2 Can't divide by Zero! 16 / 4 is 4
13:
Exception Handling
32 / 4 is 8 Can't divide by Zero! 128 / 8 is 16 No matching element found Fatal error -- program terminated
PART I
In this example, an exception that can be handled by the inner try in this case a divide-byzero error allows the program to continue However, an array boundary error is caught by the outer try, which causes the program to terminate Although certainly not the only reason for nested try statements, the preceding program makes an important point that can be generalized Often, nested try blocks are used to allow different categories of errors to be handled in different ways Some types of errors are catastrophic and cannot be fixed Some are minor and can be handled immediately Many programmers use an outer try block to catch the most severe errors, allowing inner try blocks to handle less serious ones You can also use an outer try block as a catch all block for those errors that are not handled by the inner block
Throwing an Exception
The preceding examples have been catching exceptions generated automatically by the runtime system However, it is possible to throw an exception manually by using the throw statement Its general form is shown here: throw exceptOb; The exceptOb must be an object of an exception class derived from Exception Here is an example that illustrates the throw statement by manually throwing a DivideByZeroException:
// Manually throw an exception using System; class ThrowDemo { static void Main() { try { ConsoleWriteLine("Before throw"); throw new DivideByZeroException(); } catch (DivideByZeroException) { ConsoleWriteLine("Exception caught"); } ConsoleWriteLine("After try/catch statement"); } }
The output from the program is shown here:
Before throw Exception caught After try/catch statement
Part I:
The C# Language
Notice how the DivideByZeroException was created using new in the throw statement Remember, throw throws an object Thus, you must create an object for it to throw That is, you can t just throw a type In this case, the default constructor is used to create a DivideByZeroException object, but other constructors are available for exceptions Most often, exceptions that you throw will be instances of exception classes that you created As you will see later in this chapter, creating your own exception classes allows you to handle errors in your code as part of your program s overall exception-handling strategy
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