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s1 = 122M;
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// Error!
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The output is the same as before It is important to emphasize that an implicitly typed variable is still a strongly typed variable Notice this commented-out line in the program:
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// s1 = 122M; // Error!
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This assignment is invalid because s1 is of type double Thus, it cannot be assigned a decimal value The only difference between an implicitly typed variable and a normal explicitly typed variable is how the type is determined Once that type has been determined, the variable has a type, and this type is fixed throughout the lifetime of the variable Thus, the type of s1 cannot be changed during execution of the program Implicitly typed variables were not added to C# to replace normal variable declarations Instead, implicitly typed variables are designed to handle some special-case situations, the most important of which relate to Language-Integrated Query (LINQ), which is described in 19 Therefore, for most variable declarations, you should continue to use explicitly typed variables because they make your code easier to read and easier to understand One last point: Only one implicitly typed variable can be declared at any one time Therefore, the following declaration,
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var s1 = 40, s2 = 50; // Error!
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is wrong and won t compile because it attempts to declare both s1 and s2 at the same time
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The Scope and Lifetime of Variables
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So far, all of the variables that we have been using are declared at the start of the Main( ) method However, C# allows a local variable to be declared within any block As explained in 1, a block begins with an opening curly brace and ends with a closing curly brace A block defines a scope Thus, each time you start a new block, you are creating a new scope A scope determines what names are visible to other parts of your program without qualification It also determines the lifetime of local variables The most important scopes in C# are those defined by a class and those defined by a method A discussion of class scope (and variables declared within it) is deferred until later in this book, when classes are described For now, we will examine only the scopes defined by or within a method The scope defined by a method begins with its opening curly brace and ends with its closing curly brace However, if that method has parameters, they too are included within the scope defined by the method As a general rule, local variables declared inside a scope are not visible to code that is defined outside that scope Thus, when you declare a variable within a scope, you are protecting it from access or modification from outside the scope Indeed, the scope rules provide the foundation for encapsulation Scopes can be nested For example, each time you create a block of code, you are creating a new, nested scope When this occurs, the outer scope encloses the inner scope This means that local variables declared in the outer scope will be visible to code within the inner scope
3:
D a t a Ty p e s , L i t e r a l s , a n d Va r i a b l e s
However, the reverse is not true Local variables declared within the inner scope will not be visible outside it To understand the effect of nested scopes, consider the following program:
// Demonstrate block scope using System; class ScopeDemo { static void Main() { int x; // known to all code within Main() x = 10; if(x == 10) { // start new scope int y = 20; // known only to this block // x and y both known here ConsoleWriteLine("x and y: " + x + " " + y); x = y * 2; } // y = 100; // Error! y not known here // x is still known here ConsoleWriteLine("x is " + x); } }
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