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The C# Language
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Since the second form is shorter, most programmers use it when a pointer to the start of an array is needed
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When a pointer refers to an array, the pointer can be indexed as if it were an array This syntax provides an alternative to pointer arithmetic that can be more convenient in some situations Here is an example:
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// Index a pointer as if it were an array using System; class PtrIndexDemo { unsafe static void Main() { int[] nums = new int[10]; // Index a pointer ConsoleWriteLine("Index pointer like array"); fixed (int* p = nums) { for(int i=0; i < 10; i++) p[i] = i; // index pointer like array for(int i=0; i < 10; i++) ConsoleWriteLine("p[{0}]: {1} ", i, p[i]); } // Use pointer arithmetic ConsoleWriteLine("\nUse pointer arithmetic"); fixed (int* p = nums) { for(int i=0; i < 10; i++) *(p+i) = i; // use pointer arithmetic for(int i=0; i < 10; i++) ConsoleWriteLine("*(p+{0}): {1} ", i, *(p+i)); } } }
The output is shown here:
Index p[0]: p[1]: p[2]: p[3]: pointer like array 0 1 2 3
20:
U n s a f e C o d e , P o i n t e r s , N u l l a b l e Ty p e s , D y n a m i c Ty p e s , a n d M i s c e l l a n e o u s To p i c s
p[4]: p[5]: p[6]: p[7]: p[8]: p[9]:
4 5 6 7 8 9
PART I
Use pointer arithmetic *(p+0): 0 *(p+1): 1 *(p+2): 2 *(p+3): 3 *(p+4): 4 *(p+5): 5 *(p+6): 6 *(p+7): 7 *(p+8): 8 *(p+9): 9
As the program illustrates, a pointer expression with this general form *(ptr + i) can be rewritten using array-indexing syntax like this: ptr[i] There are two important things to understand about indexing a pointer: First, no boundary checking is applied Thus, it is possible to access an element beyond the end of the array to which the pointer refers Second, a pointer does not have a Length property So, using the pointer, there is no way of knowing how long the array is
Pointers and Strings
Although strings are implemented as objects in C#, it is possible to access the characters in a string through a pointer To do so, you will assign a pointer to the start of the string to a char* pointer using a fixed statement like this: xed(char* p = str) { // After the fixed statement executes, p will point to the start of the array of characters that make up the string This array is null-terminated, which means that it ends with a zero You can use this fact to test for the end of the array Null-terminated character arrays are the way that strings are implemented in C/C++ Thus, obtaining a char* pointer to a string allows you to operate on strings in much the same way as does C/C++ Here is a program that demonstrates accessing a string through a char* pointer:
// Use fixed to get a pointer to the start of a string using System; class FixedString { unsafe static void Main() { string str = "this is a test";
Part I:
The C# Language
// Point p to start of str fixed(char* p = str) { // Display the contents of str via p for(int i=0; p[i] != 0; i++) ConsoleWrite(p[i]); } ConsoleWriteLine(); } }
The output is shown here:
this is a test
Multiple Indirection
You can have a pointer point to another pointer that points to the target value This situation is called multiple indirection, or pointers to pointers Pointers to pointers can be confusing Figure 20-1 helps clarify the concept of multiple indirection As you can see, the value of a normal pointer is the address of the variable that contains the value desired In the case of a pointer to a pointer, the first pointer contains the address of the second pointer, which points to the variable that contains the value desired Multiple indirection can be carried on to whatever extent desired, but more than a pointer to a pointer is rarely needed In fact, excessive indirection is difficult to follow and prone to conceptual errors A variable that is a pointer to a pointer must be declared as such You do this by placing an additional asterisk after the type name For example, the following declaration tells the compiler that q is a pointer to a pointer of type int:
int** q;
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