qr code c# open source PART II in Visual C#

Drawer QR Code ISO/IEC18004 in Visual C# PART II

PART II
Drawing QR Code 2d Barcode In C#.NET
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create QR Code 2d barcode image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
QR Code ISO/IEC18004 Scanner In Visual C#
Using Barcode decoder for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
Here is sample output:
Bar Code Creator In C#.NET
Using Barcode generator for .NET framework Control to generate, create barcode image in .NET framework applications.
Barcode Scanner In C#.NET
Using Barcode decoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
High Priority starting In High Priority Low Priority starting In Low Priority In High Priority
QR Code Encoder In .NET Framework
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create QR-Code image in ASP.NET applications.
Drawing Quick Response Code In .NET Framework
Using Barcode maker for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Denso QR Bar Code image in VS .NET applications.
Part II:
QR Code 2d Barcode Generator In VB.NET
Using Barcode generator for .NET Control to generate, create QR Code image in .NET framework applications.
USS-128 Generator In C#.NET
Using Barcode creator for .NET Control to generate, create UCC-128 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Exploring the C# Library
EAN13 Generator In Visual C#
Using Barcode maker for .NET framework Control to generate, create GTIN - 13 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Generating Bar Code In C#
Using Barcode generator for .NET Control to generate, create barcode image in .NET applications.
In Low Priority In High Priority In Low Priority In High Priority In Low Priority In High Priority In Low Priority In High Priority High Priority terminating Low Priority terminating High Priority thread counted to 1000000000 Low Priority thread counted to 23996334
Drawing Linear Barcode In C#.NET
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Linear image in .NET applications.
USD-4 Maker In Visual C#
Using Barcode drawer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Code 2 of 7 image in .NET applications.
In this run, of the CPU time allotted to the program, the high-priority thread got approximately 98 percent Of course, the precise output you see may vary, depending on the speed of your CPU and the number of other tasks running on the system Which version of Windows you are running will also have an effect Because multithreaded code can behave differently in different environments, you should never base your code on the execution characteristics of a single environment For example, in the preceding example, it would be a mistake to assume that the low-priority thread will always execute at least a small amount of time before the high-priority thread finishes In a different environment, the high-priority thread might complete before the low-priority thread has executed even once, for example
Encoding Code 128 Code Set A In Java
Using Barcode creator for Android Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in Android applications.
Creating Barcode In .NET
Using Barcode creation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create bar code image in ASP.NET applications.
Synchronization
Paint Code 3 Of 9 In None
Using Barcode printer for Word Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in Office Word applications.
Recognizing Bar Code In Java
Using Barcode Control SDK for Eclipse BIRT Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in BIRT applications.
When using multiple threads, you will sometimes need to coordinate the activities of two or more of the threads The process by which this is achieved is called synchronization The most common reason for using synchronization is when two or more threads need access to a shared resource that can be used by only one thread at a time For example, when one thread is writing to a file, a second thread must be prevented from doing so at the same time Another situation in which synchronization is needed is when one thread is waiting for an event that is caused by another thread In this case, there must be some means by which the first thread is held in a suspended state until the event has occurred Then the waiting thread must resume execution The key to synchronization is the concept of a lock, which controls access to a block of code within an object When an object is locked by one thread, no other thread can gain access to the locked block of code When the thread releases the lock, the object is available for use by another thread The lock feature is built into the C# language Thus, all objects can be synchronized Synchronization is supported by the keyword lock Since synchronization was designed into C# from the start, it is much easier to use than you might first expect In fact, for many programs, the synchronization of objects is almost transparent The general form of lock is shown here: lock(lockObj) { // statements to be synchronized }
Create UCC - 12 In Objective-C
Using Barcode creation for iPad Control to generate, create GTIN - 128 image in iPad applications.
Code 128A Creation In .NET
Using Barcode printer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 128B image in ASP.NET applications.
23:
Painting GTIN - 12 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET Control to generate, create UPC-A image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Code 128A Recognizer In .NET Framework
Using Barcode recognizer for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
Multithreaded Programming, Part One
Here, lockObj is a reference to the object being synchronized If you want to synchronize only a single statement, the curly braces are not needed A lock statement ensures that the section of code protected by the lock for the given object can be used only by the thread that obtains the lock All other threads are blocked until the lock is removed The lock is released when the block is exited The object you lock on is an object that represents the resource being synchronized In some cases, this will be an instance of the resource itself or simply an arbitrary instance of object that is being used to provide synchronization A key point to understand about lock is that the lock-on object should not be publically accessible Why Because it is possible that another piece of code that is outside your control could lock on the object and never release it In the past, it was common to use a construct such as lock(this) However, this only works if this refers to a private object Because of the potential for error and conceptual mistakes in this regard, lock(this) is no longer recommended for general use Instead, it is better to simply create a private object on which to lock This is the approach used by the examples in this chapter Be aware that you will still find many examples of lock(this) in legacy C# code In some cases, it will be safe In others, it will need to be changed to avoid problems The following program demonstrates synchronization by controlling access to a method called SumIt( ), which sums the elements of an integer array:
// Use lock to synchronize access to an object using System; using SystemThreading; class SumArray { int sum; object lockOn = new object(); // a private object to lock on public int SumIt(int[] nums) { lock(lockOn) { // lock the entire method sum = 0; // reset sum for(int i=0; i < numsLength; i++) { sum += nums[i]; ConsoleWriteLine("Running total for " + ThreadCurrentThreadName + " is " + sum); ThreadSleep(10); // allow task-switch } return sum; } } } class MyThread { public Thread Thrd; int[] a; int answer; // Create one SumArray object for all instances of MyThread
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.