qr code generator api c# However, in C#, the * is distributive and the declaration in Visual C#

Make QR Code 2d barcode in Visual C# However, in C#, the * is distributive and the declaration

However, in C#, the * is distributive and the declaration
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int* p, q;
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PART I PART I PART I
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creates two pointer variables Thus, in C# it is the same as these two declarations:
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int* p; int* q;
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This is an important difference to keep in mind when porting C/C++ code to C#
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The * and & Pointer Operators
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Two operators are used with pointers: * and & The & is a unary operator that returns the memory address of its operand (Recall that a unary operator requires only one operand) For example,
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int* ip; int num = 10; ip = #
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puts into ip the memory address of the variable num This address is the location of the variable in the computer s internal memory It has nothing to do with the value of num Thus, ip does not contain the value 10 (num s initial value) It contains the address at which num is stored The operation of & can be remembered as returning the address of the variable it precedes Therefore, the preceding assignment statement could be verbalized as ip receives the address of num The second operator is *, and it is the complement of & It is a unary operator that evaluates to the value of the variable located at the address specified by its operand That is, it refers to the value of the variable pointed to by a pointer Continuing with the same example, if ip contains the memory address of the variable num, then
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int val = *ip;
will place into val the value 10, which is the value of num, which is pointed to by ip The operation of * can be remembered as at address In this case, then, the statement could be read as val receives the value at address ip The * can also be used on the left side of an assignment statement In this usage, it sets the value pointed to by the pointer For example,
*ip = 100;
This statement assigns 100 to the variable pointed to by ip, which is num in this case Thus, this statement can be read as at address ip, put the value 100
Using unsafe
Any code that uses pointers must be marked as unsafe by using the unsafe keyword You can mark types (such as classes and structures), members (such as methods and operators),
Part I:
The C# Language
or individual blocks of code as unsafe For example, here is a program that uses pointers inside Main( ), which is marked unsafe:
// Demonstrate pointers and unsafe using System; class UnsafeCode { // Mark Main as unsafe unsafe static void Main() { int count = 99; int* p; // create an int pointer p = &count; // put address of count into p ConsoleWriteLine("Initial value of count is " + *p); *p = 10; // assign 10 to count via p ConsoleWriteLine("New value of count is " + *p); } }
The output of this program is shown here:
Initial value of count is 99 New value of count is 10
Using fixed
The fixed modifier is often used when working with pointers It prevents a managed variable from being moved by the garbage collector This is needed when a pointer refers to a field in a class object, for example Because the pointer has no knowledge of the actions of the garbage collector, if the object is moved, the pointer will point to the wrong object Here is the general form of fixed: xed (type* p = & xedObj) { // use xed object } Here, p is a pointer that is being assigned the address of an object The object will remain at its current memory location until the block of code has executed You can also use a single statement for the target of a fixed statement The fixed keyword can be used only in an unsafe context You can declare more than one fixed pointer at a time using a commaseparated list Here is an example of fixed:
// Demonstrate fixed using System; class Test { public int num; public Test(int i) { num = i; } }
20:
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class FixedCode { // Mark Main as unsafe unsafe static void Main() { Test o = new Test(19); fixed (int* p = &onum) { // use fixed to put address of onum into p ConsoleWriteLine("Initial value of onum is " + *p); *p = 10; // assign 10 to count via p ConsoleWriteLine("New value of onum is " + *p); } } }
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