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Managed vs Unmanaged Code
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In general, when you write a C# program, you are creating what is called managed code Managed code is executed under the control of the Common Language Runtime as just described Because it is running under the control of the CLR, managed code is subject to certain constraints and derives several benefits The constraints are easily described and met: the compiler must produce an MSIL file targeted for the CLR (which C# does) and use the NET class library (which C# does) The benefits of managed code are many, including modern memory management, the ability to mix languages, better security, support for version control, and a clean way for software components to interact The opposite of managed code is unmanaged code Unmanaged code does not execute under the Common Language Runtime Thus, all Windows programs prior to the creation of the NET Framework use unmanaged code It is possible for managed code and unmanaged code to work together, so the fact that C# generates managed code does not restrict its ability to operate in conjunction with preexisting programs
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PART I PART I PART I
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The Common Language Specification
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Although all managed code gains the benefits provided by the CLR, if your code will be used by other programs written in different languages, then for maximum usability, it should adhere to the Common Language Specification (CLS) The CLS describes a set of features that different NET-compatible languages have in common CLS compliance is especially important when creating software components that will be used by other languages The CLS includes a subset of the Common Type System (CTS) The CTS defines the rules concerning data types Of course, C# supports both the CLS and the CTS
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CHAPTER
1D Generator In .NET Framework
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An Overview of C#
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GTIN - 13 Creation In Java
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y far, the hardest thing about learning a programming language is the fact that no element exists in isolation Instead, the components of the language work together This interrelatedness makes it difficult to discuss one aspect of C# without involving another To help overcome this problem, this chapter provides a brief overview of several C# features, including the general form of a C# program, some basic control statements, and operators It does not go into too many details, but rather concentrates on the general concepts common to any C# program Most of the topics discussed here are examined in greater detail in the remaining chapters of Part I
Recognize Code 3 Of 9 In C#
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UPC-A Printer In None
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Object-Oriented Programming
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Decoding Bar Code In VS .NET
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At the center of C# is object-oriented programming (OOP) The object-oriented methodology is inseparable from C#, and all C# programs are to at least some extent object oriented Because of its importance to C#, it is useful to understand OOP s basic principles before you write even a simple C# program OOP is a powerful way to approach the job of programming Programming methodologies have changed dramatically since the invention of the computer, primarily to accommodate the increasing complexity of programs For example, when computers were first invented, programming was done by toggling in the binary machine instructions using the computer s front panel As long as programs were just a few hundred instructions long, this approach worked As programs grew, assembly language was invented so that a programmer could deal with larger, increasingly complex programs, using symbolic representations of the machine instructions As programs continued to grow, high-level languages such as FORTRAN and COBOL were introduced that gave the programmer more tools with which to handle complexity When these early languages began to reach their breaking point, structured programming languages, such as C, were invented At each milestone in the history of programming, techniques and tools were created to allow the programmer to deal with increasingly greater complexity Each step of the way, the new approach took the best elements of the previous methods and moved forward The same is true of object-oriented programming Prior to OOP, many projects were nearing (or exceeding) the point where the structured approach no longer worked A better way to handle complexity was needed, and object-oriented programming was the solution
Part I:
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