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int a, b, c;
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C# 30: A Beginner s Guide
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declares three variables, a, b, and c, by use of a comma-separated list As mentioned earlier, when you need two or more variables of the same type, they can be declared in one statement Just separate the variable names by commas
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You can repeatedly execute a sequence of code by creating a loop C# supplies a powerful assortment of loop constructs The one we will look at here is the for loop If you are familiar with C, C++, or Java, you will be pleased to know that the for loop in C# works the same way it does in those languages The simplest form of the for loop is shown here: for(initialization; condition; iteration) statement; In its most common form, the initialization portion of the loop sets a loop control variable to an initial value The condition is a Boolean expression that tests the loop control variable If the outcome of that test is true, the for loop continues to iterate If it is false, the loop terminates The iteration expression determines how the loop control variable is changed each time the loop iterates Here is a short program that illustrates the for loop:
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// Demonstrate the for loop using System; class ForDemo { static void Main() { int count;
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Initialize count to zero If count is less than 5, execute the WriteLine( ) statement
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The for Loop
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ConsoleWriteLine("Counting from 0 to 4:"); for(count = 0; count < 5; count = count+1) ConsoleWriteLine(" count is " + count); ConsoleWriteLine("Done!"); } }
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Increase count by 1 each time through the loop
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The output generated by the program is shown here:
Counting from 0 to 4: count is 0 count is 1 count is 2 count is 3 count is 4 Done!
In this example, count is the loop control variable It is set to zero in the initialization portion of the for At the start of each iteration (including the first one), the conditional test count < 5 is performed If the outcome of this test is true, the WriteLine( ) statement is executed, and then
1: C# Fundamentals
the iteration portion of the loop is executed This process continues until the conditional test is false, at which point execution picks up at the bottom of the loop As a point of interest, in professionally written C# programs, you will almost never see the iteration portion of the loop written as shown in the preceding program That is, you will seldom see statements like this:
count = count + 1;
The reason is that C# includes a special increment operator that performs this operation more compactly The increment operator is ++ (two consecutive plus signs) The increment operator increases its operand by one By use of the increment operator, the preceding statement can be written like this:
count++;
Thus, the for in the preceding program will usually be written like this:
for(count = 0; count < 5; count++)
You might want to try this As you will see, the loop still runs exactly the same as it did before C# also provides a decrement operator, which is specified as (two consecutive minus signs) This operator decreases its operand by one
Using Blocks of Code
Another key element of C# is the code block A code block is a grouping of statements A code block is created by enclosing the statements between opening and closing curly braces Once a block of code has been created, it becomes a logical unit that can be used any place that a single statement can For example, a block can be a target for if and for statements Consider this if statement:
if(counter < max) { usercount = counter; delaytime = 0; }
Here, if counter is less than max, both statements inside the block will be executed Thus, the two statements inside the block form a logical unit, and one statement cannot execute without the other also executing The key point here is that whenever you need to logically link two or more statements, you do so by creating a block Code blocks allow many algorithms to be implemented with greater clarity and efficiency Here is a program that uses a block of code to prevent a division by zero:
// Demonstrate a block of code using System;
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