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#if EXPERIMENTAL && TRIAL ConsoleErrorWriteLine("Testing experimental trial version"); #else ConsoleErrorWriteLine("Not experimental trial version"); #endif ConsoleWriteLine("This is in all versions"); } }
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Compiled for experimental version Not experimental trial version This is in all versions
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Since TRIAL is not defined, the #else portion of the second conditional code sequence is used Notice that #else marks both the end of the #if block and the beginning of the #else block This is necessary, because there can only be one #endif associated with any #if Furthermore, there can be only one #else associated with any #if The #elif directive means else if and establishes an if-else-if chain for multiple compilation options #elif is followed by a symbol expression If the expression is true, that block of code is compiled and no other #elif expressions are tested Otherwise, the next block in the series is checked If no #elif succeeds, then if there is an #else, the code sequence associated with the #else is compiled Otherwise, no code in the entire #if is compiled
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Here is an example that demonstrates #elif:
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// Demonstrate #elif #define RELEASE using System; class Test { static void Main() { #if EXPERIMENTAL ConsoleWriteLine("Compiled for experimental version"); Use #elif #elif RELEASE ConsoleWriteLine("Compiled for release"); #else ConsoleWriteLine("Compiled for internal testing"); #endif #if TRIAL && !RELEASE ConsoleWriteLine("Trial version"); #endif ConsoleWriteLine("This is in all versions"); } }
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Putting together all the pieces, here is the general form of #if/#else/#elif/#endif directives: #if symbol-expression statement sequence #elif symbol-expression statement sequence #elif symbol-expression statement sequence #else symbol-expression statement sequence #endif
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The Preprocessor, RTTI, Nullable Types, and Other Advanced Topics
#undef
The #undef directive removes a previously defined symbol That is, it undefines a symbol The general form for #undef is #undef symbol For example:
#define MOBILE_DEVICE #if MOBILE_DEVICE // #undef MOBILE_DEVICE // At this point MOBILE_DEVICE is undefined
After the #undef directive, MOBILE_DEVICE is no longer defined #undef is used principally to allow symbols to be localized to only those sections of code that need them
Ask the Expert
I notice that the C# preprocessor directives have many similarities with the preprocessor directives supported by C and C++ Furthermore, in C/C++, I know that you can use #define to perform textual substitutions, such as defining a name for a value, and to create function-like macros Does C# support these uses of #define No In C#, #define is used only to define a symbol
#error
The #error directive forces the compiler to stop compilation It is used for debugging The general form of the #error directive is #error error-message When the #error directive is encountered, the error message is displayed For example, when the compiler encounters this line:
#error Debug code still being compiled!
compilation stops and the error message Debug code still being compiled! is displayed
#warning
The #warning directive is similar to #error, except that a warning rather than an error is produced Thus, compilation is not stopped The general form of the #warning directive is #warning warning-message
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#line
The #line directive sets the line number and filename for the file that contains the #line directive The number and the name are used when errors or warnings are output during compilation The general form for #line is #line number filename where number is any positive integer and becomes the newline number, and the optional filename is any valid file identifier, which becomes the new filename #line allows two options The first is default, which returns the line numbering to its original condition It is used like this:
#line default
The second is hidden When stepping through a program, the hidden option allows a debugger to bypass lines between a
#line hidden
directive and the next #line directive that does not include the hidden option
#region and #endregion
The #region and #endregion directives let you define a region that will be expanded or collapsed by the Visual Studio IDE when using the outlining feature The general form is shown here: #region // code sequence #endregion
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