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In this version, the names of the parameters are the same as the names of the instance variables, thus hiding them However, this is used to uncover the instance variables
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1 What is the difference between a class and an object 2 How is a class defined 3 What does each object have its own copy of
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6 How must a method return if it returns a value 7 What name does a constructor have 8 What does new do 9 What is garbage collection and how does it work What is a destructor 10 What is this
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More Data Types and Operators
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C# 30: A Beginner s Guide
Key Skills & Concepts
One-dimensional arrays Multidimensional arrays Jagged arrays The Length property Implicitly typed arrays Strings The foreach loop The bitwise operators The operator
his chapter returns to the subject of C# s data types and operators It discusses arrays, the string type, the bitwise operators, and the conditional operator Along the way, the foreach loop is introduced
Arrays
An array is a collection of variables of the same type that are referred to by a common name In C#, arrays can have one or more dimensions, although the one-dimensional array is the most common Arrays are used for a variety of purposes because they offer a convenient means of grouping together related variables For example, you might use an array to hold a record of the daily high temperature for a month, a list of users logged onto a network, or your collection of programming books The principal advantage of an array is that it organizes data in such a way that it can be easily manipulated For example, if you have an array containing the incomes for a selected group of households, it is easy to compute the average income by cycling through the array Also, arrays organize data in such a way that it can be easily sorted Although arrays in C# can be used just like arrays in many other programming languages, they have one special attribute: They are implemented as objects This fact is one reason that a discussion of arrays was deferred until objects had been introduced By implementing arrays as objects, several important advantages are gained, not the least of which is that unused arrays can be garbage-collected
5: More Data Types and Operators
One-Dimensional Arrays
A one-dimensional array is a list of related variables Such lists are common in programming For example, you might use a one-dimensional array to store the account numbers of the active users on a network Another array might be used to store the current batting averages for a baseball team Since arrays in C# are implemented as objects, two steps are needed to obtain one for use in your program First, you must declare a variable that can refer to an array Second, you must create an instance of the array by use of new Therefore, to declare a one-dimensional array, you will typically use this general form: type[ ] array-name = new type[size]; Here, type declares the element type of the array The element type determines the data type of the elements that comprise the array Notice the square brackets that follow type They indicate that a reference to a one-dimensional array is being declared The number of elements that the array will hold is determined by size Here is an example The following creates an int array of ten elements and links it to an array reference variable named sample:
int[] sample = new int[10];
The sample variable holds a reference to the memory allocated by new This memory is large enough to hold ten elements of type int As is the case when creating an instance of a class, it is possible to break the preceding declaration in two For example:
int[] sample; sample = new int[10];
In this case, when sample is first created, it refers to no physical object It is only after the second statement executes that sample refers to an array An individual element within an array is accessed by use of an index An index describes the position of an element within an array In C#, all arrays have zero as the index of their first element Because sample has ten elements, it has index values of 0 through 9 To index an array, specify the number of the element you want, surrounded by square brackets Thus, the first element in sample is sample[0], and the last element is sample[9] For example, the following program loads sample with the numbers 0 through 9:
// Demonstrate a one-dimensional array using System; class ArrayDemo { static void Main() { int[] sample = new int[10]; int i;
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