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CHAPTER
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Advanced Objects
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n the previous chapters, you created some basic objects In this chapter, you will add a significant amount of intelligence to columns of information Designer provides two main categories of functionality to do this: internal Designer functions and SQL functions that are RDBMS specific The first part of the chapter covers functionality that is specific to Designer but database independent The second part of the chapter covers SQL commands that may be dependent on which RDBMS you use
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Reducing Maintenance with Base Objects and @Select
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The @Select function is an internal function that allows you, as the designer, to reuse universe objects without forcing you to repeat the entire SQL syntax For example, take an initial object Sales that provides information on revenue in US dollars You can add a number of forms of intelligence to this object: Sales in Local Currency, Sales in Euros, Sales Adjusted for Inflation, Sales with 10% Projected Increase, and so on These additional objects are not columns in the database; they are objects you create by using SQL commands described in the second part of this chapter However, they all reference the same initial column in the RDBMS, such as Sales_FactAmount, and then include further calculations to local currencies or forecasts When building advanced objects with Designer, you can select either the RDBMS column or a universe object Whenever possible, select the object You will save time on universe maintenance Imagine six months from now, the physical field for Sales (Sales_FactAmount) in the RDBMS is renamed If all of the related sales objects explicitly referenced the RDBMS field, that is how many objects you now must modify manually However, if all the related sales objects used @Select, you need to modify only the one base object The syntax of @Select is @Select(Class\Object), where Class is the name of the class that contains the base object for example, Measures, and Object is the name of the object that contains the base object for example, Sales When using @Select, you can still see the full SQL statement by enabling the check box Show Object SQL in the SQL Editor In all the examples in this chapter, I use @Select whenever possible but display the full SQL syntax
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TIP Whenever possible, use objects rather than individual RDBMS columns This will save you
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work if ever you rename an RDBMS column, as you will need to modify only the SQL of the base object; Designer will automatically update the SQL for all other objects that use the base column
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Part II:
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A Better Universe
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The @Where function is similar to @Select in that you can reuse a WHERE clause from an existing object
The SQL Editor
When changing SQL statements, you can either enter the SELECT statements in the formula bar (to display, select View | Formula Bar), or you can use the SQL Editor to change either the SELECT statement or the WHERE clause The SQL Editor also provides some help on Designer functions and SQL syntax Figure 11-1 shows the SQL Editor You launch the SQL Editor by clicking the >> button from the Definition tab of the object properties As you modify the SQL for an object, you can either point and click your way through it, or you can enter the functions, columns, and operators manually Regardless of how you build the SQL statement, be sure to parse or validate (formula editor) each object as you go Parsing validates that your statement is correct and won t produce an error when a user launches a query Parsing will not catch all SQL errors and may be slower for objects that use @Select (as multiple SQL statements must be checked), but it will catch the majority In order to build a statement with point and click, you often start with the Functions box on the right For example, to create the measure object Revenue from the Island Resorts Marketing universe, as shown in Figure 11-1: 1 Modify the Object Properties by double-clicking the object, in this example, Revenue From the Select box, click >> to launch the SQL Editor 2 Under Functions, expand the Number functions by clicking the + sign Scroll to sum() and double-click Notice that the mouse insertion point is correctly between the parentheses If you had started with the Tables and Columns on the left, your mouse would be in the wrong place 3 Under Tables and Columns, expand the INVOICE_LINE table by clicking the + sign Double-click DAYS to insert INVOICE_LINEDAYS into the statement 4 Under Operators, double-click the multiplication sign (*) The list of available operators will change depending on whether you modify a SELECT statement or a WHERE clause 5 Under Tables and Columns, double-click NB_GUESTS 6 Under Operators, double-click * again 7 Under Tables and Columns, scroll to the SERVICE table, click + to expand it, and double-click PRICE The close parenthesis should still be in the correct place 8 Click Parse to ensure you have built the SQL statement correctly with the functions, operators, and parentheses in the correct positions
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