print barcode in c# .net Step 4: Creating Weapons and Armor in Software

Making EAN13 in Software Step 4: Creating Weapons and Armor

Step 4: Creating Weapons and Armor
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Chew Toy s weapon is a rotary spinning mass The design is simple: two milling saws on each side of the prow are driven by a chain sprocket mechanism As you can see in Figure 14-1, a large chain sprocket was used; it takes chain reduction
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out of the system and in doing so transmits the maximum amount of torque These saws were designed for low speed and high torque The idea is to pull an opponent into the mouth area of the robot to chew on it and send many parts flying Chew Toy s weapons system and armor were constructed from a combination of surplus catalog goodies and scavenged parts The prow (the arm) of the robot was fabricated of steel obtained from a rack-mounted computer system A 1/4-inch aluminum plate, part of the support structure for the weapons systems, came out of a dumpster Cut into the desired shape with a jigsaw, it was honed with a Dremel tool and welded to the main support structure (the ammo box) The weapon support structure fits neatly between the two fan outlets Attached to the front part of its underside is an inexpensive small furniture castor When the prow is down, that foremost wheel is not visible, but in Figure 14-4 it can be clearly seen It s bolted to the front of the machine and supports the two pillow boxes that hold the saw bearings The bearings used for the weapons system were designed for misalignment the bearings are sitting in a rubber gasket, which can move around slightly This way, we didn t have to be precise on alignment We just stuck the bearings in there, slid the axle through them, and clamped it down to get a system that is reasonably strong and spins The central theme of Chew Toy was building a robot cheaply and easily, and the KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) weapons array helped us continue that theme The large rod you see mounted to the front of the robot in Figure 14-5 is the saw axle The saws are milling tools that we picked up at a metal scrap yard Berg sprockets and chains were used to construct the saw s drive The shoulder on the sprocket was cut down with a lathe and the sprocket bolted to the saw, making one unit Although combining the saw mechanism in this way made the unit heavier, it was desirable in this case because of the increased spinning momentum
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FIGURE 14-4
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Front view with arm up; note the motor and chain drive for saws and caster under pillow boxes
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FIGURE
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Front view with arm down showing 2-by-4 and nails
it offers The design allows Chew Toy s saws to strike an opponent and keep on spinning and doing damage instead of stopping abruptly The motors that power the saws are mounted on a support structure welded to the front of the robot The saw motors also run on 24 volts instead of the recommended 12 When in battle, these motors get only intermittent use; thus, the reduction in life span from this hard usage should not pose a problem If one motor should blow out during a competition, the second one will be able to power the saws These motors were found through a surplus supply catalog Although I had no specs on their design, and I knew nothing about who made them, they were inexpensive and testing proved they had the necessary torque and would work well for their intended purpose The arm was originally intended to right the robot if it were turned on its back, but then it became a weapon in its own right The arm is made out of angle iron bought from a local hardware store Welded onto the ammo box and attached to the front is a little bent piece of steel with a hook The initial welding on Chew Toy was farmed out, and one of my teammates who had welding equipment (and skill at using it) did later welds The original arm conception has evolved considerably, and the appearance changed as we continued our improvisation Things were added as the inspiration hit us The old motherboard and perforated metal screening were attached as armor The 2-by-4 with nails was incorporated to make sure the robot could right itself should it be flipped The nails, and the reach they added, were necessary to accomplish the flipping When the arm is lowered (Figure 14-5), the nailed 2-by-4 gives the robot additional protection More of the armor in the form of circuit boards, perforated metal, and another 2-by-4 to protect the robot s rear was added when construction was nearing completion
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