Private Networks in Software

Generating QR-Code in Software Private Networks

Private Networks
Create QR-Code In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create QR Code JIS X 0510 image in Software applications.
QR Code JIS X 0510 Reader In None
Using Barcode reader for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Many companies created or built their own private networks in the past These networks are usually cost-justified or based on the availability of lines, facilities, and special needs Often these networks employ a mix of technologies, such as private microwaves, satellite communications, fiber optics, and infrared transmission The convergence of the networks has further been deployed because of the mix of services that the telephone companies did not service well Many companies with private networks have been subjected to criticisms because the networks were misunderstood Often the networks were based on voice savings and could not be justified Now that the telecommunications networks and systems are merging, the demand for higher-speed and more availability is driving either a private network or a hybrid
QR Code JIS X 0510 Drawer In Visual C#
Using Barcode printer for VS .NET Control to generate, create QR Code ISO/IEC18004 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Printing QR Code JIS X 0510 In .NET Framework
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create QR Code image in ASP.NET applications.
Hybrid Networks
Generate QR Code JIS X 0510 In .NET
Using Barcode printer for .NET framework Control to generate, create QR image in VS .NET applications.
Creating Denso QR Bar Code In VB.NET
Using Barcode maker for .NET Control to generate, create QR Code JIS X 0510 image in .NET applications.
Some companies have to decide whether to use a private- or public-switched network for their voice, data, video, and Internet needs Therefore, these organizations use a mix of services based on both private and public networks The high-end usage is connected via private facilities creating a Virtual Private Network (VPN), while the lower-volume locations utilize the switched network Installing private-line facilities comes from the integration of voice, data, video, graphics, and facsimile transmissions Now VPNs are used on the Internet to guarantee speed, throughput, quality of service, and reliability This new wave of VPN takes up where the voice VPNs left off Only by combining these services across a common circuitry will many organizations realize a savings
Painting UPC - 13 In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create GS1 - 13 image in Software applications.
Draw Code-39 In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in Software applications.
Hooking Things Up
Generating Barcode In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
GTIN - 12 Encoder In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create UPC Code image in Software applications.
The Telco uses a variety of connections to service the customer locations The typical two-wire interface to the network is terminated in a demarcation point Normally, Telco terminates in a block; this can be the standard modular block Another version of connector for digital service is an eight-conductor (four-pair) called the RJ-48X When a Telco brings in a digital circuit, the four-wire circuit is terminated into a RJ-68 or a smart jack
UCC - 12 Creator In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create GS1 128 image in Software applications.
Barcode Generation In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
Equipment
International Standard Serial Number Encoder In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create International Standard Serial Number image in Software applications.
Make Bar Code In None
Using Barcode printer for Office Word Control to generate, create barcode image in Microsoft Word applications.
Equipment in the telephony and telecommunications business is highly varied and complex The mix of goods and services is as large as the human imagination, yet the standard types are the ones that constitute the ends on the network The convergence and computerization of our equipment over the years has led to significant variations The devices that hook up to the network are covered in various other chapters, but here is a summary of certain connections and their functions in the network:
Drawing Data Matrix In .NET
Using Barcode creator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in ASP.NET applications.
Print Barcode In None
Using Barcode encoder for Online Control to generate, create barcode image in Online applications.
The Private branch exchange ( PBX) The modem (data communications device) The multiplexer (enables more users on a single line) Automatic call distributor (ACD) Voice mail system (VMS) Automated attendant (AA) Radio systems Cellular telephones Facsimile machines CATV connections Web-enabled call centers Integrated voice recognition and response systems
Print Barcode In Objective-C
Using Barcode drawer for iPhone Control to generate, create barcode image in iPhone applications.
Reading USS Code 39 In None
Using Barcode reader for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
This is a sampling of the types of equipment and services you will encounter in dealing with Telecommunications Systems and convergence in this industry
Paint UPC-A Supplement 2 In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create UPC-A image in Java applications.
Create UPC Code In None
Using Barcode drawer for Online Control to generate, create UPC A image in Online applications.
3: Virtual Private Networks
Introduction
The term Virtual Private Network can have different meanings, but it usually refers to voice or Internet In this chapter, we ll learn the meaning of the term in both environments
History
As corporate communications volumes increased, organizations realized the cost of telephone service was escalating Originally, all long distance service was charged on a per minute basis AT&T introduced a volume discount outbound calling plan called Wide Area Telephone Service [ 1 ] (WATS) For a monthly fixed payment, the organization got 240 hours of service to one of five bands across the country Each band was priced, based on the distance from the originator s location A typical company usually had a band 5 line and a band 1 or 2 to cover adjacent state calls It took some analysis to determine the most cost-effective solution for each company s particular calling pattern Foreign Exchange (FX) service provided a fixed rate-calling plan if a company had a large call volume for in-state locations This is essentially subscribing to telephone service at the foreign central office location and leasing an extension cord from the telephone company to the home location Originally, there were no usage charges on this line so the more you used it, the less expensive it was Of course, long distance calls made from the foreign exchange were billed at the long-distance rate A FX line is needed to each high volume calling location Alternatively, a company could use a leased telephone line between locations These lines went by several names: Terminal Interface Equipment (TIE) line, dedicated line, and a data line, when used for data These are essentially point-to-point telephone lines that are available in two-wire or four-wire configurations Because the difference in cost between two and four-wire connections was small (relative to the cost of the line), the four-wire option was preferred unless the company needed many lines The next logical step was to use these TIE lines to connect PBXs at the various locations Here again, there were no usage charges on these dedicated lines A company with locations in Seattle, Phoenix, Atlanta, and headquarters in Chicago might have a hub and spoke arrangement of TIE lines from their headquarters to each regional office Each location then might have FX lines to adjacent cities; for example, a company based in Seattle might have a FX line to Tacoma, Kent, and Everett (see Figure 3-1 )
Figure 3-1: Hub and spoke arrangement for TIE lines There were corresponding inbound services where the called party paid For example, the original Zenith operator provided toll-free calling in the days of manual switchboards The inbound WATS service, now known as 800 service, was originally structured also in bands Finally, for local toll service, Remote Call Forwarding (RCF) allowed people to sign up for telephone service in a foreign exchange and have them make a long distance call from Tacoma, for example, back to Seattle at your expense Although this was more expensive (depending on the number of calls) than FX, an advantage of RCF is that you can receive multiple calls at a time It soon became apparent to people working in the Phoenix location that they could call their uncle in Kent by first asking the company operator (later by dialing) for the TIE line to Chicago They would then choose the TIE line to Seattle and finally dial across the FX line to Kent The PBX, although not smart, did allow a person to dial up the TIE and FX lines The important fly in this otherwise ingenious solution (ointment) to high-cost long distance telephone service is that each TIE or FX line could only handle one call at a time The challenge for the telecommunications manager was therefore to figure out the optimum number of TIE lines between locations to minimize cost and waiting time for the TIE line, while maximizing savings across the commercial long distance circuits About this time, AT&T noticed a small drop in its long distance revenue from such business and a sharp increase in the number of leased lines it was providing Now, clearly it is much more profitable to rent a telephone channel out at $025/min than to lease that capacity to a corporation for $1000/month Table 3-1 shows somewhat optimistically the amount of revenue that a normal telephone channel could return vs the lease line Table 3-1: Comparison of usage sensitive and leased line costs Usage Cost Per Month Based on Usage
Table 3-1: Comparison of usage sensitive and leased line costs Usage Leased line Flat Rate 8hr/day usage 25/min 4 hr/day usage 25/min Cost Per Month Based on Usage $1000 $2400 $1200
From Table 3-1 , it is clear that the telephone companies much prefer switched service to dedicated service (This thumbnail sketch focuses only on business hour revenue and ignores after hour revenue and the network providers cost to provide the service)
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.