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using WF-alias = System.Windows.Forms
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With this alias defined, you can then refer to the Application class as
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WF-alias.Application.Run(new MyForm());
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Alternatively, an alias for a specific type can be created. For example, a shortcut for the Application class can be defined with:
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using MyAppAlias = System.Windows.Forms.Application
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This would permit the following line in your code:
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MyAppAlias.Run(new MyForm());
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Typically, the using directive simply indicates the namespaces employed by the program, and this is how we use this directive in our program. For example, rather than the fully qualified names System.Windows.Forms.Button and System.Windows.Forms.PictureBox, we simply use the Button and PictureBox names directly. It is worth noting that there is also a Button class in the System.Web.UI.WebControls namespace. The compiler uses the correct System.Windows.Forms.Button class because of the using keyword, and because the System.Web namespace is not referenced by our program. When we look at Visual Studio .NET in chapter 2, you will see that Visual Studio tends to use the fully qualified names everywhere. This is a good practice for a tool that generates code to guarantee that any potential for ambiguity is avoided. 1.2.2 Fields and properties Let s go back to our use of the Button and PictureBox classes. The top of our class now defines two member variables, or fields in C#, to represent the button and the picture box on our form. Here, Button and PictureBox are classes in the Windows Forms namespace that are used to create a button and picture box control on a Form. We will tend to use the terms class and control interchangeably for user interface objects in this book.3
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public class MyForm : Form { private Button btnLoad; private PictureBox pboxPhoto;
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Fields, like all types in C#, must be initialized before they are used. This initialization occurs in the constructor for the MyForm class.
public MyForm() { // Create and configure the Button btnLoad = new Button(); btnLoad.Text = "&Load"; btnLoad.Left = 10; btnLoad.Top = 10;
Or, more formally, we will use the term control to refer to an instance of any class derived from the Control class in the System.Windows.Forms namespace.
CHA PTE R 1
GETTING STARTED WITH WINDOWS FORMS
// Create and configure the PictureBox pboxPhoto = new PictureBox(); pboxPhoto.BorderStyle = System.Windows.Forms.BorderStyle.Fixed3D; pboxPhoto.Width = this.Width / 2; pboxPhoto.Height = this.Height / 2; pboxPhoto.Left = (this.Width - pboxPhoto.Width) / 2; pboxPhoto.Top = (this.Height - pboxPhoto.Height) / 2; . . .
Note the use of the new keyword to initialize our two fields. Each control is then assigned an appropriate appearance and location. You might think that members such as Text, Left, BorderStyle, and so on are all public fields in the Button and PictureBox classes, but this is not the case. Public member variables in C++, as well as in C#, can be a dangerous thing, as these members can be manipulated directly by programmers without restrictions. A user might accidentally (or on purpose!) set such a variable to an invalid value and cause a program error. Typically, C++ programmers create class variables as protected or private members and then provide public access methods to retrieve and assign these members. Such access methods ensure that the internal value never contains an invalid setting. In C#, there is a class member called properties designed especially for this purpose. Properties permit controlled access to class fields and other internal data by providing read, or get, and write, or set, access to data encapsulated by the class. Examples later in the book will show you how to create your own properties. Here we use properties available in the Button and PictureBox classes.4 We have already seen how the Text property is used to set the string to appear on a form s title bar. For Button objects, this same property name sets the string that appears on the button, in this case &Load. As in previous Windows programming environments, the ampersand character & is used to specify an access key for the control using the Alt key. So typing Alt+L in the application will simulate a click of the Load button. Windows Forms controls also provide a Left, Right, Top, and Bottom property to specify the location of each respective side of the control. Here, the button is placed 10 pixels from the top and left of the form, while the picture box is centered on the form. The Width and Heightproperties specify the size of the control. Our code creates a picture box approximately 1/2 the size of the form and roughly centered within it. This size is approximate because the Width and Height properties in the Form class actually represent the width and height of the outer form, from edge to edge.5
As we will see in later chapters, the properties discussed here are inherited from the Control class. The ClientRectangle property represents the size of the internal display area, and could be used here to truly center the picture box on the form.
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