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Fig 1211 Wind Generator Mounting Options
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Many wind machines can be converted to water generators Figure 1212 shows the outputs of four water generators versus water speed All are sized to carry the electrical load of a typical cruising boat at less than hull speed The drag typically slows a boat by a small fraction of a knot, and they are usually deployed only as needed to recharge the batteries They are popular with downwind passagemakers who are already equipped with wind machines, since relative airspeed downwind is low, but water speed is high Most mount the generator on the stem rail and trail the propeller unit with a line suf ciently stiff to transmit the torque to the generating unit (Figure 1213) Manufacturers generally recommend carrying several spare propeller units on long passages The reason is obvious: the spinning prop looks suspiciouly like live bait to a large sh! The electrical installation for dual units is the same for both wind and water operation, and is described in Figure 1210
Fig 1212 Water Generator Output Curves
Ferris WP200
Fig 1213 Aquair 100 Mounted on a Stern Rail
Generating unit
Propeller unit
12 Output, Amps
Fourwinds II & III
8 Aquair 100, standard
Aquair 100, coarse
0 0 1 2 3 4 Water Speed, Knots 5 6 7 8
Wind Powe r
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CHAPTER
13 Installing Electronics
Stainless 3 dB whip (VHF) Radar Fiberglass 6 or 9 dB whip (VHF)
Stainless 3 dB whip (VHF)
Insulated mizzen stay (SSB) Stainless whip (VHF)
Backstay insulator Insulated backstay (SSB) Radar
Fiberglass 6 dB whip (VHF) or 23' SSB Radar
Copyright 1993, 2006 by Charlie Wing Click here for terms of use
f you can install a towel rack, you can install an electronic cabinet or case But there is often more to a successful electronic installation than meets the eye This chapter focuses on communication and navigation electronics that is, electronics that use antennas Antennas are intended to receive signals It is important that the incoming signals not be attenuated, so much attention must be paid to antenna cable and connectors in addition to proper receiver and transmitter installation Receivers and transmitters include VHF radio, GPS, SSB, and radar The problem is they also receive electrical noise, so we give step-by-step procedures for identifying the sources and reducing the level with electrical lters
Antennas
Few things are as satisfying as installing your own electronics Repairing digital electronic circuitry is beyond the abilities of most, but installation is not Installation requires only an understanding of the DC wiring standards and practices in 6, wire and connectors available through chandleries and mail-order catalogs, and the principles outlined in this chapter With these in hand, you should be able to install any piece of marine electronic equipment over a weekend, and as well as any professional The obvious bene ts are a signi cant costs saving and satisfaction at accomplishing a professional job The less obvious bene t occurs when something goes wrong, and you nd that you are now able to retrace your steps and often locate the problem The equipment covered in this chapter includes VHF and SSB radios, GPS, and radar From an installation standpoint, all marine electronics are similar You ll nd that the principles and techniques apply to stereos, televisions, depth sounders, and wind indicators, as well or smaller than, objects on the boat Objects with a diameter less than 1 inch (such as a mast) can re ect or block the signal, creating blind zones Finally, signals are at least partially absorbed by grounded rigging Antennas placed too close to metal standing rigging thus suffer loss of signal strength The exception that proves the rule is the use of an insulated (ungrounded) backstay as a long SSB or ham antenna To avoid interference, antennas that are used to transmit as well as receive should be spaced from other antennas
Fig 131 Marine Antennas
Antenna Types
You can nd books on antenna design and speci c antenna designs in electronics and ham radio magazines My advice, however, is to start with the antenna recommended or supplied by the manufacturer of the equipment Many antennas are designed to work only with a speci c brand and model of equipment After you have the equipment up and running, you may decide to experiment with a different antenna The original antenna will then serve as a reference
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