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A Closer Look at Classes and Objects
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void put_i(int j) { i = j; } } ; int main() { cl s; sput_i(10); cout << sget_i(); return 0; }
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Notice the way the function code is arranged For very short functions, this arrangement reflects common C++ style However, you could also write them as shown here:
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class cl { int i; public: // automatic inline functions int get_i() { return i; } void put_i(int j) { i = j; } } ;
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In professionally written C++ code, short functions like those illustrated in the example are commonly defined inside the class declaration This convention is followed in most of the C++ examples in this book
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Passing Objects to Functions
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Objects can be passed to functions in just the same way that any other type of variable can Objects are passed to functions through the use of the standard call-by-value mechanism This means that a copy of an object is made when it is passed to a function
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However, the fact that a copy is created means, in essence, that another object is created This raises the question of whether the object s constructor function is executed when the copy is made and whether the destructor function is executed when the copy is destroyed The answer to these two questions may surprise you To begin, here is an example:
#include <iostream> using namespace std; class myclass { int i; public: myclass(int n); ~myclass(); void set_i(int n) { i=n; } int get_i() { return i; } }; myclass::myclass(int n) { i = n; cout << "Constructing " << i << "\n"; } myclass::~myclass() { cout << "Destroying " << i << "\n"; } void f(myclass ob); int main() { myclass o(1); f(o); cout << "This is i in main: "; cout << oget_i() << "\n"; return 0; } void f(myclass ob) {
21:
A Closer Look at Classes and Objects
obset_i(2); cout << "This is local i: " << obget_i(); cout << "\n"; }
This program produces this output:
Constructing 1 This is local i: 2 Destroying 2 This is i in main: 1 Destroying 1
Notice that two calls to the destructor are executed, but only one call is made to the constructor As the output illustrates, the constructor is not called when the copy of o (in main( )) is passed to ob (within f( )) The reason that the constructor is not called when the copy of the object is made is easy to understand When you pass an object to a function, you want the current state of that object If the constructor is called when the copy is created, initialization will occur, possibly changing the object Thus, the constructor cannot be executed when the copy of an object is generated in a function call Although the constructor is not called when an object is passed to a function, it is necessary to call the destructor when the copy is destroyed (The copy is destroyed like any other local variable, when the function terminates) Remember, the copy of the object does exist as long as the function is executing This means that the copy could be performing operations that will require a destructor to be called when the copy is destroyed For example, it is perfectly valid for the copy to allocate memory that must be freed when it is destroyed For this reason, the destructor must be executed when the copy is destroyed To summarize: When a copy of an object is generated because it is passed to a function, the object s constructor is not called However, when the copy of the object inside the function is destroyed, its destructor is called By default, when a copy of an object is made, a bitwise copy occurs This means that the new object is an exact duplicate of the original The fact that an exact copy is made can, at times, be a source of trouble Even though objects are passed to functions by means of the normal call-by-value parameter passing mechanism which, in theory, protects and insulates the calling argument, it is still possible for a side effect to occur that may affect, or even damage, the object used as an argument For example, if an object used as an argument allocates memory and frees that memory when it is destroyed, then its local copy inside the function will free the same memory when its destructor is called This will leave the original object damaged and effectively useless As you will see later in this book, it is possible to prevent this type of problem by defining the copy operation relative
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