Value-add vs basic voice in Visual Studio .NET

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Value-add vs basic voice
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90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Total call revenue ($ billion) Total value-added services revenue ($ billion)
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Source: Gartner/Dataquest/Bhawani Shankar/"Voice on the Net"/March 2000
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Figure 1-7 Projected breakdown of VoIP-related revenue
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100 90 80 70
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Fax over IP Wholesale VoIP Multicast over Packet Networks Unified Messaging
60 50 40 30 20 10 0 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
Voice over Public Internet Voice over ATM Voice over FR Voice over Private/Carrier IP
Source: Gartner/Dataquest/Bhawani Shankar/"Voice on the Net"/March 2000
It is interesting to note that Figure 1-6 refers to Voice over Packet, as opposed to VoIP One would be curious to know what the breakdown might be, in particular how IP fares against other technologies such as ATM or Frame Relay Figure 1-7 provides that breakdown, which shows that IP is expected to be dominant, and that ATM and Frame Relay are expected to comprise a relatively small percentage of the market
VoIP Challenges
To offer a credible alternative to traditional circuit-switched telephony, VoIP must offer the same reliability and voice quality In other words, the five nines availability requirement must be met and speech must be of toll quality Toll quality generally means a Mean Opinion Score (MOS) of 40 or better on the following scale, as specified in International Telecommunication Union Telecommunications Standardization Sector (ITU-T) Recommendation P800:
5 Excellent 4 Good
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Introduction
Introduction
3 Fair 2 Poor 1 Bad
Speech Quality
Perhaps the most important issue in VoIP is ensuring high speech quality Anyone who has made calls over the Internet can attest to the fact that the quality is variable at best In order for VoIP to be a commercial challenge to circuit-switched technology, the voice quality must be at least as good as experienced in today s telephony networks and should not vary The reason why this is such a challenge for VoIP networks is the fact that IP was not originally designed to carry voice or similar real-time interactive media IP was designed from the outset for data Among the characteristics of most data traffic is that it is asynchronous, which means that it can tolerate delay Data traffic is also extremely sensitive to packet loss, which requires mechanisms for the recipient of data packets to acknowledge a receipt, such that the sender can retransmit packets if an acknowledgment is not returned in a timely manner Voice, however, is very sensitive to delay but is more tolerant of packet loss Clearly, voice traffic imposes requirements that are quite different from those imposed by data traffic Delay In many ways, real-time communications such as voice are almost the exact opposite of data, at least from a requirements perspective To begin with, voice is more tolerant of packet loss, provided that lost packets are kept to a small percentage of the total (fewer than five percent) Voice, however, is extremely intolerant of delay Anyone who has ever made an international call over a satellite knows how annoying delay can be In a satellite call, it takes about 120 milliseconds for the signal to travel from the earth to the satellite and another 120 to come back down If we add in some additional delay due to processing and terrestrial transmission, we have a one-way delay from A to B of 250 to 300 milliseconds This means a round-trip delay of 500 to 600 milliseconds It is the round-trip time that is important Consider, for example, a conversation between A and B A is speaking and B decides to interrupt However, because of a delay, what B is hearing is already old by the time he hears it Furthermore, when B interrupts, it takes time for A to hear the interruption Therefore, it seems to B that A has ignored the interruption Therefore, B stops Now, however, A finally hears the interruption and
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