create barcodes in vb.net Drawing in 3D in Visual C#.NET

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Drawing in 3D
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This chapter covers:
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Building a 3D world 3D Transforms Our ponderings on the thoughts of electronic monks
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When we first saw that WPF had extensive support for 3D, we immediately started talking about some of the cool things we expected to be able to do, such as having controls angling off into the distance on a pane to the side of the screen to take up less real estate or creating some really cool 3D transitions. It turns out that, although it s possible to do these things, it isn t the primary target for 3D in WPF. The 3D support in WPF is reasonably extensive and pretty cool, but it s quite distinct from the 2D world we ve inhabited so far. The general approach for 3D is to put a special container into your application and then put 3D content into that. An example would be building a 3D model of your office and allowing the user to fly through it. Adding a maniac with a gun, la Quake XVII, is an optional extra. When WPF first came out, thinking about anything approaching a Quake-like game would have been unthinkable, but as the technology has progressed, it has become more and more reasonable. WPF still isn t the platform of choice for high-speed games, but it s getting there...
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Lights, camera
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In this chapter, we ll re-create the graph from chapter 14 but in 3D.
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The 3D support in WPF is a relatively thin wrapper on Direct3D, the 3D portion of DirectX. This isn t surprising, considering that WPF uses Direct3D for pretty much everything most of the 2D stuff uses Direct3D under the hood, although it s wrapped so well that you d never know it. With 3D, the implementation isn t so well hidden, making it a little more complex to use; it does still use things like XAML and the Property System, so it s not too much of a departure from what you re used to. Going through all the concepts needed to handle 3D is a book by itself one with lots of cool pictures and ugly math. The 3D capabilities in WPF, though simple (for 3D implementations), could equally take up another book. In this chapter, we re going to breach the surface of 3D to give a taste of what s possible and how it s approached. We ll take the graphing example from the previous chapter and make a 3D version of the graph (figure 15.1).
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15.1 Lights, camera
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Working with 3D is much like working on a movie set. You have to create a simulated world of three-dimensional models that represent the things that you want to show up. You have to position a camera and point it in an appropriate direction to control what you see, and you have to put in lights or you won t be able to see anything. Based on all these things, WPF will create a two-dimensional image that simulates what you d see if you were looking through the viewfinder of the camera onto the scene. The viewfinder is represented via the use of a class called Viewport3D. Viewport3D is another FrameworkElement that you can position in your layout like any control. Inside the Viewport3D is where all your 3D elements reside. This is one of the biggest limitations of the 3D support in WPF although you can easily put 3D
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Drawing in 3D
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+X (0,0) Origin
Z -Z
(0,0,0) Origin
2D Coordinate System
3D Coordinate System
Figure 15.2 In 2D, the coordinates all start in the upper-left corner and go from there. In 3D, the coordinates start at a central point and radiate outward, with right and up being positive, and down and left being negative. On the Z-axis, positive is toward the viewer, and negative is away. This order for the Z-axis follows what s called the righthand rule, once again demonstrating the bias against lefthanded people.
content in the middle of your 2D application, the 3D elements are limited to their own sandbox. In the Viewport3D sandbox, the coordinate system is different than what we re used to in the 2D world, as you can see from figure 15.2. If you were more or less awake during your geometry classes, you should recognize a three-dimensional Cartesian coordinate system; the central point where all the axes cross is 0,0,0, with the values increasing to the right, top, and toward the viewer. Also, like the real universe, but unlike the two-dimensional space, there s no explicit edge based on the width and height of the available space (other than those limits imposed by the numbering system). You can create arbitrarily large or small three-dimensional models, and they will be visible (or not) depending on where and how you set up your camera. We ll start by creating a model so that we have something to look at. Then we ll set up lighting and cameras so that we can see our models. As with the more low-level drawing in the last chapter, Visual Studio 2008 won t help us out too much, although other tools are often used to create 3D models and scenes and we expect a number of them to support exporting to XAML in the near future.
15.1.1 Models Models, as in real life, are what we look at in a 3D world. Unlike in the real world (with some very disturbing runway exceptions), WPF models are made up of little triangles because you need a minimum of three points to define a surface in a 3D world, and when you join the three points together, you get a triangle. Once the triangle is defined (by its points) and is covered in some material (say, the color blue), the system can calculate, based on the position of the camera and the available lights, how it should look on a 2D screen. But, the fact that a model is made up of triangles can make building them fairly tedious, and it s relatively unusual to build models manually. Usually a 3D design tool
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