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Now that we know the basic numeric types, we need to understand how are literals of each type are specified. Specifying numeric literals In general, you don t specify a literal having a particular type; the system will figure out the best way to represent the number. By default, an integer will be used. If the literal is too large for a 32-bit integer, a 64-bit integer will be used instead. If it s still too big or if it contains a decimal point, a System.Double will be used. (System.Single is usually skipped, but it offers no advantages and just complicates the process.) The one case where you do want to tell the system that you re requesting a specific type is with the System.Decimal type. These are specified by placing a d at the end of the number with no intervening space, as shown:
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PS (1) > ( 123 ).gettype().fullname System.Int32 PS (2) > ( 123d ).gettype().fullname System.Decimal PS (3) > ( 123.456 ).gettype().fullname System.Double PS (4) > ( 123.456d ).gettype().fullname System.Decimal
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You can see that in each case where there is a trailing d , the literal results in a [decimal] value being created. (If there is a space between the number and the d , you ll just get an error.) The multiplier suffixes Of course, plain numbers are fine for most applications, but in the system administration world, there are many special values that you want to be able to conveniently represent, namely those powers of two kilobytes, megabytes, and gigabytes. PowerShell provides a set of multiplier suffixes for common sizes to help with this, as listed in table 3.3.
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Table 3.3 The numeric multiplier suffixes Multiplication Factor 1024 1024 1024*1024 1024*1024 1024*1024*1024 1024*1024*1024 Example 1KB 2.2kb 1Mb 2.2mb 1Gb 2.14gb Equivalent Value 1024 2252.8 1048576 2306867 .2 1073741824 3371549327 .36 .NET Type System.Int32 System.Double System.Int32 System.Double System.Int32 System.Double
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Multiplier Suffix kb or KB kb or KB mb or MB mb or MB gb or GB gb or GB
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Yes, the PowerShell team is aware that these notations are not consistent with the IEC recommendations (kibabyte, and so on). Since the point of this notation is convenience and most people in the IT space are more comfortable with Kb than with Ki, we choose to err on the side of comfort over conformance in this one case. Sorry. This particular issue generated easily the second most heated debate on the PowerShell internal and external beta tester lists. We ll cover the most heated debate later when we get to the comparison operators.
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Hexadecimal literals The last item we cover in this section is hexadecimal literals. When working with computers, it s obviously useful to be able to specify hex literals. PowerShell uses the same notation as C, C#, and so on; namely preceding the number with the sequence 0x and allowing the letters A-F as the extra digits. As always, the notation is caseinsensitive as shown in the following examples.
PS (1) > 0x10 16 PS (2) > 0x55 85 PS (3) > 0x123456789abcdef 81985529216486895 PS (4) > 0xDeadBeef -559038737
Now that we ve covered the basic literals, string and numbers, let s move on to the more interesting and less common ones. 3.2.3 Collections: dictionaries and hashtables One of the most flexible datatypes supported in PowerShell is the hashtable. This datatype lets you map a set of keys to a set of values. For example, we may have a hashtable that maps red to 1, green to 2, and yellow to 4.
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A dictionary is the general term for a data structure that maps keys to values. In the .NET world, this takes the form of an interface (IDictionary) that describes how a collection should do this mapping. A hashtable is a specific implementation of that interface. While the PowerShell hashtable literal syntax only creates instances of System.Collections.Hashtable, scripts that you write will work properly with any object that implements IDictionary.
Creating and inspecting hashtables In PowerShell, you use hash literals to create a hashtable inline in a script. Here is a simple example:
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