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LAB 202
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LABORATORY MANUAL
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Beaker 1 Mass of silver nitrate (g) Initial mass of copper wire (g) Final mass of copper wire (g) Mass of copper wire used in reaction (g) Formula weight of copper (g/mol) Moles of copper used in reaction (mol) Final mass of filter paper and Ag (g) Initial mass of filter paper (g) Mass of Ag on filter paper (g) Formula weight of Ag (g/mol) Moles of Ag on filter paper (mol) Divide moles of Ag by moles of Cu used Appearance of beaker 1 after 20 minutes Data values
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Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc
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Data Table 2
Beaker 2 Mass of potassium nitrate (g) Initial mass of copper wire (g) Final mass of copper wire (g) Mass of copper wire used in reaction (g) Formula weight of copper (g/mol) Moles of copper used in reaction (mol) Final mass of filter paper and substance (g) Initial mass of filter paper (g) Mass of substance on filter paper (g) Formula weight of K (g/mol) Moles of substance on filter paper (mol) Divide moles of K by moles of Cu used Appearance of beaker 2 after 20 minutes Data values
Laboratory Manual
Chemistry: Matter and Change 20
Name
Date
Class
LAB 202
LABORATORY MANUAL
Analyze and Conclude
1 Collecting and Interpreting Data Did a reaction occur in beaker 1 In beaker 2
2 Comparing and Contrasting What is the ratio of moles of Ag formed to moles of Cu
consumed in beaker 1
3 Applying Concepts If the reduction of Ag requires only one electron per atom, how
many electrons per Cu atom were oxidized
4 Drawing a Conclusion What is the oxidation number of the Cu ion in solution
5 Observing and Inferring Use your knowledge of reactivity from 10 to infer
why no reaction took place in beaker 2
6 Error Analysis Compare your predictions to the experimental results Explain any
differences
Real-World Chemistry
1 Silver is an important element in photography 2 The amount of reduction is dependent on the
This is due to the oxidation reduction reaction of silver bromide in the presence of light 2AgBr light 0 2Ag Br2 What substance is oxidized in this reaction Which substance is reduced
wavelength (or energy) of the light Violet light is the most energetic visible wavelength It requires only 15 seconds to reduce the same amount of silver bromide that is reduced in 55 minutes with yellow light Why is a red light used in most darkrooms
Chemistry: Matter and Change 20
Laboratory Manual
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc
Name
Date
Class
LABORATORY MANUAL
Use with Section 213
Electrolysis of Water
ater has a remarkably complex structure For the purposes of electrolysis, however, it is convenient to think of water as an aqueous solution of H and OH ions In the presence of an anode, which has a surplus of electrons, the H ions are attracted and they line up to receive electrons Conversely, at an electron-hungry cathode, OH ions line up to donate electrons To test for the presence of hydrogen, inject the gas to be tested into bubble solution The resulting bubbles should ignite easily To test for the presence of oxygen, insert a glowing splint into the gas The splint should immediately ignite In this lab, you will discover what happens when an electric current is passed through water
Problem
What happens when an electric current is passed through water
Materials
solid bromothymol blue indicator (a few grains) dilute sodium bicarbonate solution (10 mL) dilute vinegar (10 mL) glycerol (1 mL) fine copper wire (20 cm) 2-cm piece of platinum wire or graphite pencil leads silicone putty wood splints (4) 5-mL disposable graduated pipettes (2) 5-mL disposable syringes (2) 25-mL beaker 100-mL beaker small polypropylene transfer pipettes (2) surgical rubber or silicone tubing (5 cm) ring stand clamps (2) matches 6-V, 9-V, or 12-V DC source wire leads for power source glass stirring rod
Objectives
Observe the pH of water near the electrodes Collect and identify the gases that evolve at the electrodes Draw conclusions about the composition of water
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc
Safety Precautions
Always wear safety goggles and a lab apron Use care around flames Secure loose clothing and tie back long hair Never place the pipettes in your mouth
Pre-Lab
1 Write equations for the reactions at each
Procedure
Part A: Electrode Assembly
1 Cut a plastic graduated pipette into a piece that is
electrode 2 Hypothesize about the pH you would expect to observe at each electrode What ratio of gases do you expect to observe Record your hypothesis on page 163
5-cm long Similarly, cut a piece of surgical rubber tubing 4-cm long 2 Thread a length of copper wire through a piece of the graduated pipette Wrap an end of the copper wire around the end of one of the platinum or graphite electrodes, as shown in Figure A, step 1
Chemistry: Matter and Change 21
Laboratory Manual
Name
Date
Class
LAB 211
LABORATORY MANUAL
Part B: Electrolysis of Water
1 Place about 10 mL of water in a 25-mL beaker
Copper wire
Platinum or graphite electrode
Step 1 Wrapping the wire Silicon putty
3 4
Step 2 Sealing the ends
Figure A 5
3 Pull the copper wire and the electrode inside the
Copper wire
Syringe
Syringe
Anode housing (from step 2) Silicon putty Surgical tubing
Surgical tubing Polypropylene transfer pipette
Polypropylene transfer pipette Anode
Cathode
Figure B
Chemistry: Matter and Change 21
Laboratory Manual
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc
length of pipette 4 Seal the ends of the pipette using silicon putty, as shown in Figure A, step 2 This is the anode 5 Assemble the electrodes as shown in Figure B Note that the platinum or graphite electrode, as prepared above, serves as the anode The cathode is copper wire mounted in a section of the pipette tube, which is then fitted over the end of a syringe Surgical rubber tubing is used to seal the joint between the syringe tip and the pipette The rubber tubing can be folded double to make the seal tighter Silicon putty is used in the anode housing to ensure that the copper wire is not exposed in the anode
Add a few grains of solid bromothymol blue Stir until the bromothymol blue has dissolved If the solution is yellow, dip a glass stirring rod in dilute sodium bicarbonate solution Transfer this solution to the indicator solution and stir Continue adding dilute sodium bicarbonate solution until the solution turns green If the solution is blue, carry out the same procedure with diluted vinegar until the solution turns green Lubricate the inner walls of the syringe with a few drops of glycerol Use the syringe of each assembly to fill the pipette tubing and about 1 mL of the syringe with the indicator solution Make sure there are no air bubbles in either assembly Submerse the electrodes in the beaker of water and clamp them in position using a ring stand and two clamps Connect a DC battery to the electrodes Remember that the cathode is the positive electrode The electrodes should start to bubble If necessary, withdraw the syringe pistons from time to time to ensure that the gases collect in the syringes Allow the electrolysis to continue until you can see that gases have accumulated Record the volume of gas collected at each electrode in Data Table 1
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