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There are several alternatives for storing XML data in nonrelational data storage systems: Store in at les Since XML is primarily a le format, a natural storage mechanism is simply a at le This approach has many of the drawbacks, outlined in 1, of using le systems as the basis for database applications In particular, it lacks data isolation, integrity checks, atomicity, concurrent access, and security However, the wide availability of XML tools that work on
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III Object Based Databases and XML
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le data makes it relatively easy to access and query XML data stored in les Thus, this storage format may be suf cient for some applications Store in an XML Database XML databases are databases that use XML as their basic data model Early XML databases implemented the Document Object Model on a C++-based object-oriented database This allows much of the object-oriented database infrastucture to be reused, while using a standard XML interface The addition of an XML query language provides declarative querying It is also possible to build XML databases as a layer on top of relational databases
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A central design goal for XML is to make it easier to communicate information, on the Web and between applications, by allowing the semantics of the data to be described with the data itself Thus, while the large amount of XML data and its use in business applications will undoubtably require and bene t from database technologies, XML is foremost a means of communication Two applications of XML for communication exchange of data, and mediation of Web information resources illustrate how XML achieves its goal of supporting data exchange and demonstrate how database technology and interaction are key in supporting exchange-based applications
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1071 Exchange of Data
Standards are being developed for XML representation of data for a variety of specialized applications ranging from business applications such as banking and shipping to scienti c applications such as chemistry and molecular biology Some examples: The chemical industry needs information about chemicals, such as their molecular structure, and a variety of important properties such as boiling and melting points, calori c values, solubility in various solvents, and so on ChemML is a standard for representing such information In shipping, carriers of goods and customs and tax of cials need shipment records containing detailed information about the goods being shipped, from whom and to where they were sent, to whom and to where they are being shipped, the monetary value of the goods, and so on An online marketplace in which business can buy and sell goods (a so-called business-to-business B2B market) requires information such as product catalogs, including detailed product descriptions and price information, product inventories, offers to buy, and quotes for a proposed sale Using normalized relational schemas to model such complex data requirements results in a large number of relations, which is often hard for users to manage The relations often have large numbers of attributes; explicit representation of attribute/element names along with values in XML helps avoid confusion between attributes Nested element representations help reduce the number of relations that must be
Silberschatz Korth Sudarshan: Database System Concepts, Fourth Edition
III Object Based Databases and XML
10 XML
The McGraw Hill Companies, 2001
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represented, as well as the number of joins required to get required information, at the possible cost of redundancy For instance, in our bank example, listing customers with account elements nested within account elements, as in Figure 103, results in a format that is more natural for some applications, in particular for humans to read, than is the normalized representation in Figure 101 When XML is used to exchange data between business applications, the data most often originate in relational databases Data in relational databases must be published, that is, converted to XML form, for export to other applications Incoming data must be shredded, that is, converted back from XML to normalized relation form and stored in a relational database While application code can perform the publishing and shredding operations, the operations are so common that the conversions should be done automatically, without writing application code, where possible Database vendors are therefore working to XML-enable their database products An XML-enabled database supports an automatic mapping from its internal model (relational, object-relational or object-oriented) to XML These mappings may be simple or complex A simple mapping might assign an element to every row of a table, and make each column in that row either an attribute or a subelement of the row s element Such a mapping is straightforward to generate automatically A more complicated mapping would allow nested structures to be created Extensions of SQL with nested queries in the select clause have been developed to allow easy creation of nested XML output Some database products also allow XML queries to access relational data by treating the XML form of relational data as a virtual XML document
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