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LDAP: the Mechanical Superstructure for DEN
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There is some confusion about how DEN and LDAP fit together, probably because LDAP looks so much like DEN The DEN metadata model is interested only in defining a scheme to bring network infrastructure into a common directory data store, not in creating yet another new directory technology Thus, DEN uses LDAP for a big part of DEN's superstructure (see Table 2-1) Table 2-1: The DEN Model's Incorporation of LDAP
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LDAP Specification
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LDAP Functionality/Relationship to DEN
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Information model
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LDAP defines attributes and values, inherited from X500, almost without alteration DEN incorporates "personorganization" elements for use in many types of network device transactions LDAP defines how "person-organization" elements are organized into objects DEN incorporates LDAP's schema, but also borrows schema from CIM In order to be easily implemented by any LDAP-compliant directory product, DEN incorporates the LDAP naming convention In order to be easily implemented by any LDAP-compliant directory product, DEN incorporates LDAP's specification for security DEN has no particular spin on network security The specifics of client access to and updating of directory information are left up to the LDAP specification The DEN model deals only with data, not with runtime logistics such as add, delete, search, and compare operations DEN relies totally on LDAP to map onto TCP/IP for transport DEN relies on product-specific APIs for implementation In that regard, LDAP's API or, rather, its implementation within an LDAP-compliant product must be used to extend or tap into a DEN-compliant directory The LDAP Data Interchange Format (LDIF) provides a simple text format for representing directory entries LDIF is used to map to and perform data exchange operations with X500
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Naming model
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Protocol API
LDIF
directories and proprietary directories DEN has no equivalent tool, relying instead on LDIF
LDAP was created to fix X500's infamous problems with bloated overhead and difficulty of use X500 is such a glutton that only UNIX servers for the most part can run it, but the vast majority of users are on PCs LDAP was designed to simplify and streamline X500 in order to resuscitate the integrated directory service movement LDAP has apparently succeeded: the IETF released LDAP v3 in 1997, and there are now dozens of LDAP applications in the marketplace LDAP is said to be "the way to implement DEN in the real world" It should be noted, however, that LDAP (much like DEN) is not presented as a stand-in for relational databases, file systems, or DNS LDAP is an integrated directory service, pure and simple Table 2-1 lists LDAP version 3's eight major features, and how DEN incorporates them to make itself desirable and feasible Both LDAP and DEN are abstract specifications LDAP isn't a "product" any more than DEN is: rather, it's a spec on how vendors can design directory products that will interoperate within IP networks The point to remember is that DEN incorporates LDAP for its mechanical infrastructure, and in so doing also subsumes a big part of X500 But DEN goes a step farther to incorporate CIM classes, as well, to handle general computer-platform objects Last, DEN redefines a number of classes on its own to handle network objects that are addressed by neither X500 (via LDAP) nor CIM addresses LDAP is being implemented in a broad array of Web browsers, e-mail programs, and other types of network applications It has also been adopted by the powerhouse directory services products Perhaps most significantly (from a market share standpoint), LDAP is the primary access protocol for Active Directory
The DEN Information Model
DEN builds an information model that holds "meta-information" in its schema That is, the DEN information model is made up of "information about information" instead of the actual information itself For example, DEN specifies data to be stored on routing protocols, but leaves it to individual DEN-compliant directory products to determine how and where to store that data As a highly abstracted object model, DEN seeks to standardize the data formats and relationships for objects down to the level at which individual vendors diverge according to market niche, technology of choice, and design style A vendor of fiber-optic transmission technology, for instance, has data needs different from those of a vendor making infrared wireless media But as layer-1 physical media, the products of these vendors share certain characteristics (such as maximum transmission distance) The DEN model has a common placeholder for that property shared by the two media types This is said to be inheritance, where common properties are shared by the parent's subclasses
In our example of fiber-optic and infrared media objects, not only do the two media types share common objects by inheritance, but they use their own to store data-specific information This data schema technique is called generalization In relational databases it has the positive effect of having to store a particular type of data only in a single place For DEN, generalization through inheritance also has the advantage of making it easier to link disparate directory formats within the data schema In essence, DEN works by setting up a hierarchy of classes that contain related objects The higher you are in the DEN information model, the more removed you are from the actual things (routers, servers, users) being stored in other words, things are more abstract at the higher levels The farther down the model you go, the closer you are to real objects But everything remains,
nevertheless, abstract, because the DEN specification leaves off where vendor and user implementation begin To take another example, DEN has a class for microchips, but it does not have classes for particular kinds of chips This is what's meant by base schema Network device makers that are incorporating the specific Motorola or IBM chips are responsible for deciding what data about those devices to store, which they do by creating subclasses to hold information specific to particular product lines This is what's meant by extended schema the schema is extended from a superclass to a subclass As a DEN-compliant technology, Active Directory features this type of extensibility
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