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Cable or network equipment could be too close to a source of interference
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The Unit Statistics Report illustrated in Figure 7-14 is the same as the Port Statistics Report, except that it is the aggregate of all the port data A quick check of the Unit Statistics Report can alert you to problems on the network without having to check each port individually
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Figure 7-14: Unit Statistics Report
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The RMON Statistics Report (Figure 7-15) presents information collected by the RMON groups supported on this hub These statistics were described previously in the "Port Statistics Report Menu" section
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Figure 7-15: RMON Statistics Report Total frames (received) Total octets Runts Good broadcast frames Good multicast frames Total collisions FCS (Frame Check Sequence) errors Alignment errors Jabber errors
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Oversize frames Undersize frames The benefit of RMON support is that you can gather the information in a network management tool and display the data in a variety of views Figure 7-16 shows a bar graph representation of the data available
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Figure 7-16: HP OpenView RMON statistics graph
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The Unit Addressing Report shows the source address (MAC) of the station currently accessing the specified port This report is helpful for troubleshooting when you know the MAC address of a device and are trying to find the port it's connected to
Integrating Hubs into the Network
Hubs still have their place in the Ethernet network True, it's only a matter of time before they are eclipsed by a new breed of low-cost switches However, until the cost per port is equal, hubs will always be of use on the network The two primary areas in which hubs hold their own are the workgroup environment and the server room At the workgroup level, 10/100 hubs provide a low-cost way to get desktops on the network The setting may be a remote office with 10 users, two servers, and a small-office/home-office (SOHO) router, where 100 Mbps shared is more than adequate bandwidth It may be in a server room, where the high-volume servers all have dedicated 100 Mbps switch ports and a handful of low-volume servers; and miscellaneous administrative workstations share a single 100 Mbps switch port through, say, a FastHub 424M 10/100 It's always nice to have a few extra ports available, anyway, and a hub is the least expensive option The other bonus offered by a hub is that it can quickly be swapped out for a switch without much pain and suffering That said, let's take a look at the role of a hub in a workgroup and in a server room
The Workgroup
This workgroup scenario consists of a small 10-user segment with two file/print servers, one printer, and a small wide-area router connected back to headquarters This same setup could just as well be a small segment in a campus network, where the router is connected to the network backbone instead of a WAN We'll use two Cisco 1538 hubs The first one is a 1538M (with Management) and the second an unmanageable 1538 These two 1538 Series hubs will be stacked using the integrated stacking connectors and the stacking cable Our small office will have 16 ports enough to attach all our devices with a few open ports left over Since the 1538 is auto-sensing, we'll be able to connect the 10 Mbps workstations and printers, as well as the 100 Mbps servers, to the same stack A router serves as a connecting point from our network to a WAN link that connects to headquarters This network scenario is illustrated in Figure 7-17 It's a very compact configuration and can be installed into the smaller areas typical of small/remote offices available for network equipment
Figure 7-17: Using hubs in the workgroup environment
The Server Room
The server room scenario comprises a collection of high- and low-volume servers, three administrative PCs, and two printers The switch is connected directly to the network backbone via a router It has been determined that three of the servers, both printers, and two of the administrative PCs have fairly low bandwidth requirements and could be on the FastHub 424M 10/100 The remaining two servers and one administrative PC all have high requirements for bandwidth and will have to be on the 100 Mbps switch This places the low-bandwidth devices strategically on a shared media, while high-throughput devices reside on their own collision domain (off the switch) This scenario is illustrated in Figure 7-18
Figure 7-18: Using hubs in the server room environment One major benefit to this arrangement is the availability of additional network ports without much additional expense In dynamic environments, there is often need for additional ports; having some available lets you deploy additional servers quickly while additional dedicated switch ports are being acquired
Summary
In this chapter, we reviewed the fundamentals of repeater technology, Ethernet standards, and IEEE 8023 10BaseT and 100BaseT specifications In doing so, we highlighted the differences between Class I and Class II repeaters We learned about Cisco's FastHub Series of Class II repeaters, and covered the cabling specifications used when connecting to and cascading repeaters We took a closer look at cable specifications commonly used in today's networks, as well
as other cabling options such as fiber-optic cabling and its support for 10BaseFL and 100BaseFX This chapter's walkthrough of the installation and configuration of a Cisco FastHub 216 gives us a good representation of the entire Cisco FastHub Series We discussed the importance of ensuring that the equipment be installed in a clean, cool, and dry environment, and that the network equipment and cabling be kept free of obstructions and away from sources of electrical interference We also took a look at the SNMP configuration options and identified the key statistics generated by the SNMP and RMON management interface Finally, we looked at two scenarios in which hubs can be installed cost-effectively in the network This chapter concludes Part II The next section focuses on managing these networks we have learned how to build
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