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C++: The Complete Reference
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Here is the second version of the skeleton, which uses the modern style
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/* A modern-style C++ program that uses the new-style headers and a namespace */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { return 0; }
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This version uses the C++-style header and specifies a namespace Both of these features were mentioned in passing earlier Let's look closely at them now
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The New C++ Headers
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As you know, when you use a library function in a program, you must include its header This is done using the #include statement For example, in C, to include the header for the I/O functions, you include stdioh with a statement like this:
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#include <stdioh>
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Here, stdioh is the name of the file used by the I/O functions, and the preceding statement causes that file to be included in your program The key point is that this #include statement normally includes a file When C++ was first invented and for several years after that, it used the same style of headers as did C That is, it used header files In fact, Standard C++ still supports C-style headers for header files that you create and for backward compatibility However, Standard C++ created a new kind of header that is used by the Standard C++ library The new-style headers do not specify filenames Instead, they simply specify standard identifiers that may be mapped to files by the compiler, although they need not be The new-style C++ headers are an abstraction that simply guarantee that the appropriate prototypes and definitions required by the C++ library have been declared Since the new-style headers are not filenames, they do not have a h extension They consist solely of the header name contained between angle brackets For example, here are some of the new-style headers supported by Standard C++ <iostream> <fstream> <vector> <string>
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An Overview of C++
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The new-style headers are included using the #include statement The only difference is that the new-style headers do not necessarily represent filenames Because C++ includes the entire C function library, it still supports the standard C-style header files associated with that library That is, header files such as stdioh or ctypeh are still available However, Standard C++ also defines new-style headers that you can use in place of these header files The C++ versions of the C standard headers simply add a "c" prefix to the filename and drop the h For example, the C++ new-style header for mathh is <cmath> The one for stringh is <cstring> Although it is currently permissible to include a C-style header file when using C library functions, this approach is deprecated by Standard C++ (that is, it is not recommended) For this reason, from this point forward, this book will use new-style C++ headers in all #include statements If your compiler does not support new-style headers for the C function library, then simply substitute the old-style, C-like headers Since the new-style header is a relatively recent addition to C++, you will still find many, many older programs that don't use it These programs employ C-style headers, in which a filename is specified As the old-style skeletal program shows, the traditional way to include the I/O header is as shown here
#include <iostreamh>
This causes the file iostreamh to be included in your program In general, an old-style header file will use the same name as its corresponding new-style header with a h appended As of this writing, all C++ compilers support the old-style headers However, the old-style headers have been declared obsolete and their use in new programs is not recommended This is why they are not used in this book While still common in existing C++ code, old-style headers are obsolete
Namespaces
When you include a new-style header in your program, the contents of that header are contained in the std namespace A namespace is simply a declarative region The purpose of a namespace is to localize the names of identifiers to avoid name collisions Elements declared in one namespace are separate from elements declared in another Originally, the names of the C++ library functions, etc, were simply put into the global namespace (as they are in C) However, with the advent of the new-style headers, the contents of these headers were placed in the std namespace We will look closely at namespaces later in this book For now, you won't need to worry about them because the statement
using namespace std;
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