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Matching cloud providers to your needs
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Want complete control Need to stress/load test an app (for example, load up 1,000 instances)
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And as for avoiding lock-in, Amazon EC2 is good because Amazon-compatible services can and will be easily provided by other companies as well as an open-source initiative. The leader always gets to set the standards. EC2 is practically the closest to zero lock-in of any choice you can make today.
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Microsoft Windows Azure IaaS and PaaS cloud
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Azure is intermediate between application frameworks, such as App Engine, and hardware virtual machines, such as EC2. Microsoft is trying to make the transition from desktop (data center) to its cloud as seamless as possible. The company suggests that you can build and test an application locally and then deploy to its cloud. But Microsoft does admit that all UI and any data-extraction logic must be rewritten to deal with low-bandwidth internet connections. Note that we said its cloud. In that sense, Microsoft is similar to App Engine and Force.com in terms of locking you in to its cloud, run by the company. Use Windows Azure if you
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Already use the .NET and SQL Server portions of the Microsoft stack Have existing code developed to those Microsoft APIs Have teams that normally develop in Visual Studio using C# Want to blend development from desk top to cloud Have no issue with lock-in to Microsoft
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As for lock-in, Windows Azure isn t looking as bad as Google App Engine. Although it will still be hosted exclusively by Microsoft, it may be possible for other companies to come up with (almost) compatible cloud service because core pieces of Windows Azure are based on the well-known SQL Server, IIS, and .NET framework stacks.
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Google App Engine PaaS cloud
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Google App Engine is a tightly controlled environment a decision Google made to enable automatic scaling of application threads as well as the datastore. The environment supports only Python and Java, and no installation of any open source software is possible. Use App Engine if you
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Have no preexisting code Are building request-response web apps or mashups Consider time-to-market the most important thing Aren t doing anything fancy (installing software) Aren t worried about lock-in to Google
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App Engine is high on the lock-in scale. It s hard to imagine any compatible products from any other company for a long time, if ever. It s proprietary, and Google doesn t plan
Understanding cloud computing classifications
to release its technology. Automatic scale and time-to-market have many advantages, but almost complete lock-in will most likely be the price you pay for those benefits.
Ruby on Rails PaaS cloud
Ruby is slightly more computationally expensive than other languages, but having easy resource expansion available can cure a lot of the what if I get mentioned on Oprah scares that business people experience. Rails is a particularly good match for cloud computing because of its shared-nothing architecture. This means you can generate new instances of an application, and they will begin to run. And developers love Ruby because of their much higher productivity. Many small companies are now providing RoR clouds (many layered on top of Amazon). Use Ruby on Rails if you
Are building request-response web apps with existing Ruby expertise Consider time-to-market critical Aren t doing anything fancy (installing software) Don t care about lock-in
Lock-in isn t a big concern with RoR because, as we ve said, there are many choices of RoR vendors and probably more to come.
Force.com PaaS cloud
Force.com is an extension of the SaaS service Salesforce.com. Many companies have been using Salesforce for a long time. They have rich, sophisticated databases of sales contacts, history of sales cycles, information about their products, and a lot of other sales-process related information. This information forms the crown jewels of any company s sales team, and companies want many applications that aren t built into Salesforce.com. For this reason, Salesforce.com created a framework using many of the same back-end services used by the company s main SaaS application, operating on the same back-end data, and made it accessible and programmable to end users. Force.com is ideal for building applications that tie into your existing Salesforce.com databases, such as sales contacts, the internal sales team, your products, and so on. Use Force.com if you
Are already a customer of Salesforce.com s SaaS customer-resource-management product Have a requirement for a simple mashup style of web application Are willing to use Force.com s specialized programming language Don t care about lock-in
We didn t include a section about when to use private cloud because it s a much more complex discussion. We ll deal with the subject in chapter 4.
Summary
Summary
This chapter built on your understanding from chapter 1 of the types of clouds and the reasons technical and economic for this step in the evolution of computing. We ve focused on how the cloud works by looking under the hood and examining the technological underpinnings. Cloud providers are making phenomenal economies of scale. Their costs keep getting lower while their specialized expertise in operating these massive data centers gets better. This chapter examined some of the core enabling technologies of cloud computing. First and foremost is virtualization, which even most corporate data centers have embraced as a way to increase server utilization and thereby lower costs. Because a cloud is a virtualized server environment where you can quickly crate new instances of machines or applications and then control them over the network, both automation and network access are also vital in cloud computing. An API to create, operate, expand elastically, and destroy instances is also required. Trends seem to be leading in the direction of Amazon s API becoming an industry standard. We looked at cloud storage, focusing on Amazon s S3 API as an example. You saw how relational databases don t scale because they have to be shared. This has led to the emergence of new key-value types of databases as the norm in the cloud. One of the biggest benefits of moving to the cloud is the ability to scale almost infinitely as application demand grows. You learned how this elasticity works with the example of the calls required in Amazon EC2 to create an automatically scaled, load-balanced EC2 application. We compared Amazon s SimpleDB to Google s BigTable. This chapter also compared and contrasted the major flavors of cloud computing. Amazon EC2 is the most prominent example of IaaS. Microsoft Azure is mostly IaaS as well but has many PaaS offerings. Google is the most prominent of the PaaS with its App Engine. The plethora of Ruby on Rails offerings (such as Force.com from Salesforce) are highly specialized types of platforms. Somewhat tongue in cheek, we expanded the taxonomy of cloud terms to include data center as a service and examined the concept of private clouds to see if this is something that will stick or is just a fad. This understanding of the cloud classifications should help you avoid the all-too-common apples to oranges comparisons between, say, an IaaS and a PaaS cloud. You re now in a position to distinguish between them. More important, you re in a better position to make an informed decision about what s best for you, depending on what you re trying to do. You ve learned that a major driver behind this IT evolution isn t technology but economics. Consequently, we ll spend the next chapter looking closely at the business case for cloud computing.
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