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Ring topology was prevalent when IBM introduced its local-area network Token Ring Today, the need for higher-speed LANs has made this topology less popular Hybrid Topology A network can be hybrid For example, we can have a main star topology with each branch connecting several stations in a bus topology as shown in Figure 19
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Figure 19 A hybrid topology: a star backbone with three bus networks
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Computer networks are created by different entities Standards are needed so that these heterogeneous networks can communicate with one another The two best-known standards are the OSI model and the Internet model In 2 we discuss these two models The OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) model defines a seven-layer network; the Internet model defines a five-layer network This book is based on the Internet model with occasional references to the OSI model
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Today when we speak of networks, we are generally referring to two primary categories: local-area networks and wide-area networks The category into which a network falls is determined by its size A LAN normally covers an area less than 2 mi; a WAN can be worldwide Networks of a size in between are normally referred to as metropolitanarea networks and span tens of miles
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A local area network (LAN) is usually privately owned and links the devices in a single office, building, or campus (see Figure 110) Depending on the needs of an organization and the type of technology used, a LAN can be as simple as two PCs and a printer in someone's home office; or it can extend throughout a company and include audio and video peripherals Currently, LAN size is limited to a few kilometers
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INTRODUCTION
Figure 110 An isolated IAN connecting 12 computers to a hub in a closet
LANs are designed to allow resources to be shared between personal computers or workstations The resources to be shared can include hardware (eg, a printer), software (eg, an application program), or data A common example of a LAN, found in many business environments, links a workgroup of task-related computers, for example, engineering workstations or accounting PCs One of the computers may be given a largecapacity disk drive and may become a server to clients Software can be stored on this central server and used as needed by the whole group In this example, the size of the LAN may be determined by licensing restrictions on the number of users per copy of software, or by restrictions on the number of users licensed to access the operating system In addition to size, LANs are distinguished from other types of networks by their transmission media and topology In general, a given LAN will use only one type of transmission medium The most common LAN topologies are bus, ring, and star Early LANs had data rates in the 4 to 16 megabits per second (Mbps) range Today, however, speeds are normally 100 or 1000 Mbps LANs are discussed at length in s 13, 14, and 15 Wireless LANs are the newest evolution in LAN technology We discuss wireless LANs in detail in 14
Wide Area Network
A wide area network (WAN) provides long-distance transmission of data, image, audio, and video information over large geographic areas that may comprise a country, a continent, or even the whole world In s 17 and 18 we discuss wide-area networks in greater detail A WAN can be as complex as the backbones that connect the Internet or as simple as a dial-up line that connects a home computer to the Internet We normally refer to the first as a switched WAN and to the second as a point-to-point WAN (Figure 111) The switched WAN connects the end systems, which usually comprise a router (internetworking connecting device) that connects to another LAN or WAN The point-to-point WAN is normally a line leased from a telephone or cable TV provider that connects a home computer or a small LAN to an Internet service provider (lSP) This type of WAN is often used to provide Internet access
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