how to make barcodes in excel 2010 Figure 2313 Stream delivery in Software

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Figure 2313 Stream delivery
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Sending and Receiving Buffers Because the sending and the receiving processes may not write or read data at the same speed, TCP needs buffers for storage There are two buffers, the sending buffer and the receiving buffer, one for each direction (We will see later that these buffers are also necessary for flow and error control mechanisms used by TCP) One way to implement a buffer is to use a circular array of I-byte locations as shown in Figure 2314 For simplicity, we have shown two buffers of 20 bytes each; normally the buffers are hundreds or thousands of bytes, depending on the implementation We also show the buffers as the same size, which is not always the case
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Figure 2314 Sending and receiving buffers
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Figure 2314 shows the movement of the data in one direction At the sending site, the buffer has three types of chambers The white section contains empty chambers that can be filled by the sending process (producer) The gray area holds bytes that have been sent but not yet acknowledged TCP keeps these bytes in the buffer until it receives an acknowledgment The colored area contains bytes to be sent by the sending TCP However, as we will see later in this chapter, TCP may be able to send only part of this colored section This could be due to the slowness of the receiving process or perhaps to congestion in the network Also note that after the bytes in the gray chambers are acknowledged, the chambers are recycled and available for use by the sending process This is why we show a circular buffer The operation of the buffer at the receiver site is simpler The circular buffer is divided into two areas (shown as white and colored) The white area contains empty chambers to be filled by bytes received from the network The colored sections contain received bytes that can be read by the receiving process When a byte is read by the receiving process, the chamber is recycled and added to the pool of empty chambers Segments Although buffering handles the disparity between the speed of the producing and consuming processes, we need one more step before we can send data The IP layer, as a service provider for TCP, needs to send data in packets, not as a stream of bytes At
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PROCESS-TO-PROCESS DELIVERY: UDp, TCp, AND SCTP
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the transport layer, TCP groups a number of bytes together into a packet called a segment TCP adds a header to each segment (for control purposes) and delivers the segment to the IP layer for transmission The segments are encapsulated in IP datagrams and transmitted This entire operation is transparent to the receiving process Later we will see that segments may be received out of order, lost, or corrupted and resent All these are handled by TCP with the receiving process unaware of any activities Figure 2315 shows how segments are created from the bytes in the buffers
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Figure 2315 TCP segments
Sending process Receiving process
Next byte to accept Next byte to deliver
SegmentN
Segment 1
L-----jI-+JjIUIlii"illiliil II 11Hl-+-_----1
Note that the segments are not necessarily the same size In Figure 2315, for simplicity, we show one segment carrying 3 bytes and the other carrying 5 bytes In reality, segments carry hundreds, if not thousands, of bytes
Full-Duplex Communication
TCP offers full-duplex service, in which data can flow in both directions at the same time Each TCP then has a sending and receiving buffer, and segments move in both directions
Connection-Oriented Service
TCP, unlike UDP, is a connection-oriented protocol When a process at site A wants to send and receive data from another process at site B, the following occurs: 1 The two TCPs establish a connection between them 2 Data are exchanged in both directions 3 The connection is terminated Note that this is a virtual connection, not a physical connection The TCP segment is encapsulated in an IP datagram and can be sent out of order, or lost, or corrupted, and then resent Each may use a different path to reach the destination There is no physical connection TCP creates a stream-oriented environment in which it accepts the responsibility of
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