n New subnet mask: After subnetting a network you will have a new subnet in Software

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n New subnet mask: After subnetting a network you will have a new subnet
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mask that is used by all subnets you have created
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n Network ID: all host bits set to 0 n First valid address: low-order host bit set to 1; all other host bits are 0 n Broadcast address: all host bits set to 1 n Last valid address: low-order host bit set to 0; all other host bits are 1
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You know that the new subnet mask is 25519200, so you can start by calculating the network ID of each of the two subnets To determine each piece of information listed previously, you need to determine all of the on/off states of the number of bits that you have stolen For example, two bits were stolen to create
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Subnetting and Routing
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more networks, so there are four possible on/off states with two bits: 00, 01, 10, and 11 As calculated in your binary work area, it would look like the following table:
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first octet (Decimal) original iP
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second octet (binary)
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0 00000000 01000000 10000000 11000000
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third octet (binary)
0 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
fourth octet (binary)
0 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
The next thing to do after calculating all of the on/off state combinations of two bits is to add in the remaining 0s to the bits that represent the host ID portion Remember that the original network ID was 10000, so the first octet will start with 10, no matter what you change in the binary, because you are starting your work with the second octet After you fill in the host bits with all 0s, the next thing you need to do is to cross out the first and last lines; they are illegal, because the subnetted bits are all 0s and all 1s With the two illegal addresses crossed out, there are only two lines remaining, each representing one of the two networks This work is shown in the following table:
first octet (Decimal) original iP
second octet (binary)
0 00000000 01000000 10000000 11000000
third octet (binary)
0 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
fourth octet (binary)
0 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
Understanding Subnetting
The next step is to bring the 10 down to the first octet; each network ID will start with 10 because that is what it was originally After bringing the 10 down in the first octet, you then calculate the network ID of each of the two networks by leaving all host bits set to 0 (the nonbolded bits) as shown in the following table:
first octet (Decimal) original iP
10 10 10 10 10
second octet (binary)
0 00000000 01000000 10000000 11000000
third octet (binary)
0 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
fourth octet (binary)
0 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
Calculation
106400 1012800
In this example, because the two high-order bits are being set, there will be network IDs of 106400 and 1012800 The next number, which can be calculated easily, is the first valid address that can be assigned to a host on each of these networks To calculate the first valid address, you simply enable the lowestorder bit The lowest-order bit will be the bit on the far right side The work area is shown in the following table, and you can see that with the two networks you have a first valid address for each network of 106401 and 1012801:
first octet (Decimal) original iP
10 10 10 10 10
second octet (binary)
0 00000000 01000000 10000000 11000000
third octet (binary)
0 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
fourth octet (binary)
0 00000000 00000001 00000001 00000000
Calculation
106401 1012801
5:
Subnetting and Routing
Now that you have calculated the first valid address for each of the two networks, you will need to calculate the broadcast address The broadcast address is the address that any system will send data to in order to ensure that each system on the network reads the data To calculate the broadcast address, you will enable all of the host bits and get the outcome in the following table:
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