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Any statement that returns a value is an expression. You ve already seen the assignment expression, which we ll discuss in more detail in a moment, and we ve mentioned that the assignment expression returns the value that s assigned. In this chapter, you ll see a number of mathematical expressions, which return a computed value, and also comparison expressions, which return the Boolean value true or false.
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The Assignment Operator (=)
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As you saw in 3, the assignment operator causes the operand on the left side of the operator to have its value changed to whatever is on the right side of the operator. The following expression assigns the value 15 to myVariable:
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myVariable = 15;
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The operand on the right doesn t have to be a constant; it can be another variable. For example, if myVariable is set to 15, you can then write this:
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myOtherVariable = myVariable;
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This means that myOtherVariable is now equal to the value in myVariable, which is 15. Remember that in assignment, it s the variable on the left that gets the assigned value. The assignment operator also allows you to chain assignments, assigning the same value to multiple variables, as follows:
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myOtherVariable = myVariable = 15;
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The preceding statement assigns 15 to myVariable, and then also assigns the value (15) to myOtherVariable. This works because the statement:
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myVariable = 15;
is an expression; it evaluates to the value assigned. That is, the expression:
myVariable = 15;
itself evaluates to 15, and it is this value (15) that is then assigned to myOtherVariable.
It is important not to confuse the assignment operator (=) with the equality, or equals, operator (==), which has two equals signs and is described later in the chapter. The assignment operator does not test for equality; it assigns a value.
Mathematical Operators
C# uses five mathematical operators: four for standard calculations and one to return the remainder when dividing integers. The following sections consider the use of these operators.
Mathematical Operators |
Simple Arithmetic Operators (+, , *, /)
C# offers four operators for simple arithmetic: the addition (+), subtraction ( ), multiplication (*), and division (/) operators. The + and operators are obvious, and work as you might expect. The * operator for multiplication may look a bit odd if you re not used to it, but there s nothing else special about it. Division, however, is slightly unusual, depending on the types you re dividing. When you divide two integers, C# divides like a child in the third grade: it throws away any fractional remainder. Thus, dividing 17 by 4 returns a value of 4 (C# discards the remainder of 1). This limitation is specific to integer division. If you do not want the fractional part thrown away, you can use one of the types that support decimal values, such as float or double. Division between two floats (using the / operator) returns a decimal answer. Integer and floating-point division is illustrated in Example 4-1.
using using using using System; System.Collections.Generic; System.Linq; System.Text;
namespace Example_4_1_ _ _ _Integer_and_Float_Division { class Program { public static void Main( ) { int smallInt = 5; int largeInt = 12; int intQuotient; intQuotient = largeInt / smallInt; Console.WriteLine("Dividing integers. {0} / {1} = {2}", largeInt, smallInt, intQuotient); float smallFloat = 5; float largeFloat = 12; float FloatQuotient; FloatQuotient = largeFloat / smallFloat; Console.WriteLine("Dividing floats. {0} / {1} = {2}", largeFloat, smallFloat, FloatQuotient); } } }
| 4: Operators
The output looks like this:
Dividing integers. 12 / 5 = 2 Dividing floats. 12 / 5 = 2.4
The Modulus Operator (%)
Of course, you might want to calculate the remainder from an integer division, not throw it away. For that, C# provides a special operator, modulus (%), to retrieve the remainder. For example, the statement 17%4 returns 1 (the remainder after integer division).
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