You read that statement as Seventeen modulo four equals one or, for short, Seventeen mod four. in C#.NET

Generator ANSI/AIM Code 128 in C#.NET You read that statement as Seventeen modulo four equals one or, for short, Seventeen mod four.

You read that statement as Seventeen modulo four equals one or, for short, Seventeen mod four.
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Example 4-2 demonstrates the effect of division on integers, floats, doubles, and decimals. Notice the escaped characters used in the output, which we discussed in WriteLine( ) and Output in 3.
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using using using using System; System.Collections.Generic; System.Linq; System.Text;
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namespace Example_4_2_ _ _ _Modulus_operator { class ValuesProgram { static void Main( ) { int firstInt, secondInt; float firstFloat, secondFloat; double firstDouble, secondDouble; decimal firstDecimal, secondDecimal; firstInt = 17; secondInt = 4; firstFloat = 17; secondFloat = 4; firstDouble = 17; secondDouble = 4; firstDecimal = 17; secondDecimal = 4; Console.WriteLine("Integer:\t{0}\nfloat:\t\t{1}", firstInt / secondInt, firstFloat / secondFloat); Console.WriteLine("double:\t\t{0}\ndecimal:\t{1}", firstDouble / secondDouble, firstDecimal / secondDecimal);
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Mathematical Operators |
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Console.WriteLine("\nRemainder (modulus) from integer division:\t{0}", firstInt % secondInt); } } }
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The output looks like this:
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Integer: 4 float: 4.25 double: 4.25 decimal: 4.25 Remainder(modulus) from integer division:
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The modulus operator is more than a curiosity; it greatly simplifies finding every nth value, as you ll see in 5.
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You ll often find yourself needing to manipulate the value in a variable, and then store that result back in the original variable. Suppose, for example, that you have a variable inventory, which you use to keep track of the quantity of widgets you have in your warehouse. You wouldn t want to have to create new variables every time inventory increases or decreases; you want the current value to always be available in inventory. C# provides several operators for just these kinds of calculations.
The Calculate and Reassign Operators
Suppose you want to increase the mySalary variable by 5,000 (congratulations on your raise!). You can do this by writing:
mySalary = mySalary + 5000;
In simple arithmetic, this would make no sense, but that s because it s not an equation, it s a C# assignment expression. In C#, this line means add 5,000 to the value in mySalary, and assign the sum back to mySalary. Thus, after this operation completes, mySalary will have been incremented by 5,000. You can perform this kind of assignment with any mathematical operator:
mySalary = mySalary * 5000; mySalary = mySalary - 5000;
and so forth.
| 4: Operators
The need to perform this kind of manipulation is so common that C# includes special operators for self-assignment. These operators are +=, -=, *=, /=, and %=, which, respectively, combine addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and modulus with self-assignment. Thus, you can write the previous three examples as:
mySalary += 5000; mySalary *= 5000; mySalary -= 5000;
These three instructions, respectively, increment mySalary by 5,000, multiply mySalary by 5,000, and subtract 5,000 from the mySalary variable.
Increment or Decrement by 1
You may have noticed from the preceding section that C# developers like to save keystrokes. Another mathematical operation you ll use a lot is incrementing and decrementing by exactly 1. You ll find that you need counters of all sorts, starting with loop controllers in 5. C# provides two additional special operators for these purposes: increment (++) and decrement (--). So, if you want to increment the variable myAge by 1, you can write:
myAge++;
This is equivalent to writing either of the following:
myAge = myAge + 1; myAge += 1;
The Pre x and Post x Operators
To complicate matters further, you might want to increment a variable and assign the results to a second variable:
resultingValue = originalValue++;
That raises a question: do you want to assign before you increment the value, or after In other words, if originalValue starts out with the value 10, do you want to end with both resultingValue and originalValue equal to 11, or do you want resultingValue to be equal to 10 (the original value) and originalValue to be equal to 11 C# offers two specialized ways to use the increment and decrement operators: prefix and postfix. The way you use the ++ operator determines the order in which the increment/decrement and assignment take place. To use the prefix operator to increment, place the ++ symbol before the variable name; to use the postfix operator to increment, place the ++ symbol after the variable name:
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