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Creating DataMatrix in Java Wo r k i n g w i t h S t r i n g s a n d R e g u l a r E x p re s s i o n s

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Greedy, Reluctant, and Possessive Quantifiers
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Actually, there are three varieties of quantifiers: greedy, reluctant, and possessive The quantifier examples just shown are examples of the greedy variety They match the longest matching sequence A reluctant quantifier (also called a lazy quantifier) matches the shortest matching sequence To create a reluctant quantifier, follow it with a A possessive quantifier matches the longest matching sequence and will not match a shorter sequence even if it would enable the entire expression to succeed To create a possessive quantifier, follow it with a + Let s work through examples of each type of quantifier that attempt to find a match in the string "simple sample" The pattern s+e will match the longest sequence, which is the entire string "simple sample" because the greedy quantifier + will match all characters after the first s, up to the final e The pattern s+ e will match "simple", which is the shortest match This is because the reluctant quantifier + will stop after finding the first matching sequence The patttern s++e will fail, because the possessive quantifier ++ will match all characters after the initial s Because it is possessive, it will not release the final e to enable the overall pattern to match Thus, the final e will not be found and the match fails
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Boundary Matchers
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Sometimes you will want to specify a pattern that begins or ends at some boundary, such as at the end of a word or the start of a line To do this, you will use a boundary matcher Perhaps the most widely used boundary matchers are ^ and $ They match the start and end of the line being searched, which by default are the start and end of the input string For example, given the string "test1 test2", the pattern test $ will match "test2", but the pattern ^test matches "test1" If you want to match one of these characters as itself, you will need to use an escape sequence: \^ or \$ The other boundary matchers are shown here:
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Matcher \A \b \B \G \Z \z Matches Start of string Word boundary Non-word boundary End of prior match End of string (Does not include line terminator) End of string (Includes the line terminator)
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The OR Operator
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When creating a pattern, you can specify one or more alternatives by using the OR operator, which is | For example, the expression may|might will match either the word may or the word might Often the OR operator is used within a parenthesized group To understand why, imagine that you want to find all uses of either may or might along with any words that surround them Here is one way to compose an expression that does this:
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\w+\s+(may|might)\s+\w+\b
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Given the string I might go I may not this regular expression finds these two matches: I might go I may not If the parentheses around the | are removed, as in
\w+\s+may|might\s+\w+\b
the expression will find these two matches: might go I may The reason is that the | now separates the entire subexpression \w+\s+may from the subexpression might\s+\w+\b Therefore, the entire expression will match phrases that begin with some word followed by may , or phrases that begin with might followed by some word
Groups
A group is created by enclosing a pattern within parentheses For example, the parenthesized expression (may|might) in the preceding section forms a group In addition to linking the elements of a subexpression, groups have a second purpose Once you have defined a group, another part of a regular expression can refer to the sequence captured by that group Each set of parentheses defines a group The leftmost opening parenthesis defines group one, the next opening parenthesis defines group two, and so on Within a regular expression, groups are referred to by number The first group is \1, the second is \2, and so forth Let s work through an example Assume that you want to find phrases within the same sentence in which both singular and plural forms of a word are used For the sake of simplicity, also assume that you only want to find plurals that end in s (In other words, assume that you want to find plurals such as dogs, cats, and computers, and not special-case plurals such as oxen) For instance, given these sentences I had one dog, but he had two dogs She had a cat, but did she want more cats She also has a dog But his dogs were bigger you want to find the phrase dog, but he had two dogs because it contains both a singular form and a plural form of dog within the same sentence and the phrase cat, but did she want more cats because it contains both cat and cats within the same sentence You don t want to find instances that span two or more sentences, so you don t want to find the dog and dogs contained in the last two sentences Here is one way to write a regular expression that does this:
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