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Once the hardware is installed and configured, there are only a few types of problems you could have in establishing a wireless connection most of these in the few variables that must align correctly between any access point and client adapter to establish a connection between themselves and with a specific network Some of these problems are easily solved, and some require specific knowledge and technical intervention with more hardware or sense of the magic of wireless signals Below is a mini troubleshooting guide, including the following problems:
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SSID Is the SSID known and properly configured at the client system
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Improper WEP key ASCII alphanumeric or Hex key 40/64- or 104/128-bit DHCP configuration Access point preventing client IP setup from DHCP server Wireless signal quality Nonexistent to intermittent to weak/poor signal Wrong WEP Key Index 0 3 or 1 4 correlation
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SSID If you do not know the SSID of the network access point you wish to connect with, you will have a very tough time making the connection even if you know the WEP key information Many private networks are secured first by configuring the access points so that the SSID is not broadcast This will not prevent someone from deciphering the SSID and WEP key out of the data that exists on the wireless signal, then trying to make a connection, but it makes the task more difficult The lesson is that you need to know the SSID of the access points you want to connect to whether or not the SSID is broadcast and place this information into the SSID entry point for the client-side wireless connection configuration Otherwise, your client-side has no idea which network to try to connect with WEP key Using the wrong WEP key to attempt a connection to an access point that requires one is another show-stopper Unfortunately, this element of networking takes us back to the early days of DOS, and perhaps before, with hand-coded PCs when users typically knew how to deal with a lot of cryptic alphanumeric representations of bits of text or even nonsense text characters The WEP key is passed between the client and the access point in hexadecimal form, but there is a provision in most devices to provide the key information in plain ASCII text, which is then converted to Hex format If you are lucky, your client or access point setup program will reveal the Hex format of your ASCII test WEP key entry and if so record both the text and Hex versions of the key, in case you run into a configuration program that will accept only one or the other If you feel the need to experiment with different ASCII and Hex sequences, or figure out one from the other, a quick pass by the wwwpowerdogcom Web site should satisfy you If you would rather try the conversions yourself, check the ASCII Hex conversion chart in the appendices
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Indications that you are using the wrong key are usually onscreen messages indicating some form of failure to authenticate either by a recurring login dialog; an apparent authentication, but no data packets flow back and forth (monitored by the network status screen of Windows or your adapter s configuration or status program); or the lack of a valid TCP/IP configuration, covered next The remedy for your WEP key woes is to determine the correct WEP key in ASCII and Hex for all four key index references, whether the key required is 40/64-bit or 104/128-bit and which of the four key index references is being used at the access point Provide that information at the appropriate point in your client configuration, and if you do not have any of the other common problems, your connection should come together just fine Dynamic client configuration There is nothing worse than making sure you can establish a solid connection with an access point and then failing to connect with the network beyond the access point If you think you have connected to an access point but cannot access any network resources or surf the Web, then your client configuration has probably not been provided useful TCP/IP address information for the network you are using, or the client configuration you are trying to use has the wrong information Most wireless networks are set up so that either the access point provides DHCP services with supplied TCP/IP information, or the access point passes through DHCP requests and configuration to the client-side adapter so you do not have to be bothered with knowing the network information for every wireless network you use Without the right TCP/IP information, your client system might as well not be connected to the network at all by wires or wireless as the network s router will ignore or block your data When DHCP is used to configure network clients automatically, your client device may receive an address within the host network s preassigned IP address range, or a private nonroutable IP address beginning with 10xxx or 192168xx addresses Within this automatic configuration scheme, your client device will also receive a gateway address and probably a DNS server address or two A typical failed automatic TCP/IP configuration results in your client system being assigned a default and little used 169xxx-range private IP address, and you will see no gateway/router or DNS addresses being assigned to your client
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