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Fiber-optic basics Fiber-optic cable configurations Fiber-optic connectors Structured/centralized fiber Equipment considerations Safety considerations
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Fiber optics has an important place in LAN wiring Fiber can generally support faster applications over longer distances than copper cabling Fiber is also the first medium chosen for implementing new high-speed technologies, such as gigabit and 10 Gigabit Ethernet Fiber-optic cabling occupies an increasingly important place in the networking arena and it is important to understand this key technology Optical fiber was initially used for intercity telecommunications links to replace antiquated and overloaded microwave links at a lower cost than satellite links In this application, T-carrier links, and later SONET links, provided extensions of the telecommunications services over long distances The intercity fiber featured advantages of long range, wide bandwidth, interference immunity, and relatively low installation cost, compared to the bandwidth provided In fact, it was this lower-cost, relatively high bandwidth fiber-optic technology that fueled the modern wide area communications revolution In the wide area, the availability of right-of-way for fiber cable installation was the key to building a fiber network One of the earliest implementers utilized partnerships with railway companies to place fiber along rail lines from coast to coast International communications also benefited from this technology, as literally thousands of fibers of fiber-optic cable were placed along the ocean beds between continents The development of this high-volume intercity fiber network required significant advancements in the technology of both optical fiber and optical transceivers As the technology moved forward, devices and materials became available for use in the bandwidth-hungry LAN domain as well LANs have quickly adopted faster data transmission technologies during the same period of time These data topologies, such as gigabit and 10 Gigabit Ethernet, require high transmission bandwidths and have really put twisted-pair copper to the test Fiber-optic cable, in contrast, has a vastly superior bandwidth capability, particularly at the shorter distances prevalent in LANs The focus of this chapter will be to provide a concise explanation of the utility of fiber-optic technology in the LAN environment We will explore the many facets of fiber-optic technology as they relate to LAN applications Some of these topics overlap wiring technologies that are covered in other parts of this book We will repeat the key points here with reference to chapters in the book for supplementation where appropriate Fiber-optic components are an integral part of structured cabling and may be used in concert with copper components, with each technology doing what it does best
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Before we delve into the LAN applications, let s review the basics of fiber-optic technology We need to understand how optical transmission works and what the key terms and parameters are
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Fiber-Optic Transmission The phenomenon of the transmission of light through fiber-optic media comes from the optical principles of refraction and reflection As you know, a beam of light bends when it passes from one medium into another The most familiar example of this is the air-water transition Fill a pan with water and place a coin at the midpoint of the pan s bottom Now, stand back from the pan and place a straw (or pencil) into the water, along your line of vision to the coin The straw appears to bend upward from the straightline path at the surface of the water Place the straw into the water from the right or left side, and you will see the same upward bend The straw has obviously not bent, but the reflected light from the part of the straw below the water s surface has bent at the air-water interface, making the straw appear to bend This bending of light as it passes from material to material is called refraction Materials that transmit light have a property called the index of refraction1 that is proportional to the amount of bending that would occur between a given material and a vacuum reference Both air and water have respective indexes that indicate this behavior While the air-water refraction is trivial (unless you are spear fishing), the same refraction principle is used in forming lenses, such as those used for vision correction, and can be used to collimate light, as well As illustrated in Fig 111, the path of a ray of light bends at the interface between two transmissive materials The amount of the bend is determined by the index of refraction However, beyond a
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