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In most applications, Gigabit Ethernet is used as a backbone technology TIA568-A5 allowed slightly different requirements for the backbone links, permitting both multimode and single-mode fiber In this application, multimode fiber is used much the same, although the bandwidth, mode dispersion, and transmission attenuation are much more significant issues These factors are the primary parameters limiting the range of multimode fiber at gigabit data rates Here, the differences of using the previously recommended TIA-568-A 625/125 m fiber and the more expensive 50/125 m fiber are clear The 625 fiber is generally limited to a range of about 250 m, whereas the 50 mm fiber can extend over twice the distance using 850 nm optics (see Table 121) One must use more expensive 1300 nm optics to use the 625 m fiber at 500 m For this and other reasons, the TIA-568-C standard allows the use of both 50/125 m multimode and single-mode fiber in horizontal and other applications Gigabit Ethernet Fiber Optic Connectors When the TIA-568-A standard was finalized, the preferred connector for horizontal and backbone fiber runs was the 568 SC connector, an assembly of two SC fiber terminations linked together into a pluggable module However, that arrangement has an outlet footprint about 1 1/2 times as wide as the modular RJ inserts used for copper connections The only way to use the 568 SC in a wall plate is to decouple the modules so they plug into a nonadjacent plate opening, or to redesign the plate and perhaps the snap-in modules so that a two-wide insert can be accommodated Naturally, fiber connector manufacturers responded by beginning to develop connectors that allowed duplex fiber mating within the standard snap-in module space that was designed for the RJ connectors In a departure from past standardization actions, the TIA in TIA-568-C took the unusual step of declining a specific recommendation for the small form factor connector, as it is called Rather, they specify only the connector and mating performance characteristics and maintain the transmit-receive A/B orientation of the connection The result is that several different duplex fiber connectors are in use, each supported by up to 10 manufacturers You can find more information on this issue in 11 Gigabit Wiring Standards for Copper TIA-568-A defined cabling standards for both twisted-pair copper and fiber-optic cabling The minimum standard that is considered usable for gigabit networking is Category 5 However, if you are planning on using Cat 5 installed cabling that was
TIA-568-C now allows single-mode fiber to be used in horizontal, backbone, centralized, and openoffice applications
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tested before Addendum 5 to TIA-568-A, you should use the additional testing requirements of TSB-95 to verify the cable for gigabit performance levels (as described later in this section) The original specifications for Category 5 components (connecting hardware and cable) were developed with the view that 155 Mbps was about the limit for the technology Also, it was assumed (rashly, in hindsight) that most implementations would use only two pairs of the 4-pair cable, as was the case with 100BaseTX So the test parameters based on a 100 MHz limit tested two pairs at a time, to allow for the expected signaling structures This allows for a third harmonic component of a 333 MHz fundamental signal, essentially within the requirements for the 100 and 155 Mbps technologies In order to place gigabit rates on the same type of cable, all four pairs are required The net effect is that the rate is split by four, and through further encoding, reduced to allow operation within the 100 MHz-tested Channel But just barely! It is a little risky to place the reliable operation of your network on an infrastructure that just meets the minimum criteria for operation on day one This means that there can be absolutely no room for any aging of any of the components, and no deterioration of the connections for the life of the installation That borders on the absurd The solution has been to provide a series of enhanced-performance categories or levels to make certain that installed wiring could meet the needs of Gigabit Ethernet, and other technologies So-called enhanced Category 5e cable became available almost immediately To sort out the various claims, the TIA began studies to supplement and revise the TIA-568-A standard At the same time, Anixter, the wiring component distributor that began the system that resulted in the TIA s component category definition, set up a new levels system for Category 5 cable This system recognizes that better can be quantified (and, no doubt, priced as well) See Table 125 The result was Category 5e (enhanced Cat 5) The most obvious difference in Cat 5e cable performance is seen through crosstalk A cable with a lower NEXT (and FEXT, the far-end measurement) will naturally perform better at all the frequencies As a matter of fact, the point at which a link ceases to function for a particular frequency range is where the attenuation and the NEXT are equal For early constructions of Cat 5 cable, this point was engineered to just over 100 MHz So, let s look first at several of the critical component parameters at gigabit speeds Then, we will discuss the advances beyond Cat 5 that can get you reasonable performance margins at gigabit and beyond Attenuation at Gigabit Rates As a signal travels along a cable, the resistance, capacitance, and inductance of the copper wires act to reduce the amplitude of the
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