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PART II
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IT Auditing: Using Controls to Protect Information Assets, Second Edition
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Auditing Windows Clients
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Checklist for Auditing Windows Clients
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1 Determine whether the client is running the company-provisioned firewall 2 Determine whether the client is running a company-provisioned antivirus program 3 Determine whether the client is running a company-provisioned patch-management solution 4 Determine whether the client is equipped with the minimum recommended service pack, hotfixes, and software 5 Ensure that the client has all the following according to the Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer (MBSA) 6 Scan the system using a commercial-grade network scanner 7 Evaluate physical security controls during a walk-through
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CHAPTER
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Auditing Unix and Linux Operating Systems
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This chapter discusses the steps required for auditing Unix- and Linux-based operating systems (also referred to as *nix systems) and includes the following: The history of Unix and Linux Basic commands for getting around in the *nix environment How to audit Unix and Linux systems, focusing on the following main areas: Account management and password controls File security and controls Network security and controls Audit logs Security monitoring and general controls Tools and resources for enhancing your *nix audits
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Background
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Unix dates back to 1969, when it was developed by employees at AT&T for the purpose of providing an environment in which multiple users could run programs Strong security was not one of the goals of its development In the late 1970s, students at University of California, Berkeley, made extensive modifications to the AT&T Unix system, resulting in the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) Unix variant, which became very popular in academic circles Around the same time, AT&T began a push to develop its Unix operating system into a legitimate commercial product called AT&T System V (or just System V) During the 1980s, as commercial interest in the Unix operating system grew, companies faced the dilemma of deciding which of the two versions of Unix to adopt Sun Microsystems SunOS and Digital Equipment Corporation s Ultrix were based on the BSD Other companies that tried to develop a Unix-based OS, including Hewlett-Packard (HP), IBM, and Silicon Graphics, used System V as their standard Microsoft developed a third version of Unix, called Xenix, and licensed it to Santa Cruz Operations (SCO) Xenix was based on a prior version of the AT&T Unix operating system
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IT Auditing: Using Controls to Protect Information Assets, Second Edition
All these versions of Unix obviously resulted in confusion in the industry and frustration for vendors who were attempting to develop software for use on Unix-based platforms This resulted in the merging of some versions, beginning with Xenix and AT&T s System V in 1988 Next was a merger of AT&T and Sun s versions, called System V Release 4 (SVR4), which was to be compatible with programs written for either System V or BSD Sun later named its proprietary version of this operating system Solaris Not to be left out, a number of the other companies, such as IBM and HP, formed an organization called the Open Software Foundation (OSF), whose mission was to put control of Unix in the hands of a not-for-profit group The OSF operating system (OSF/1) was never widely adopted, and the individual companies continued to develop and use their own proprietary Unix variants, such as IBM s AIX, HP s HP-UX, SCO Unix, and IRIX Linux, a Unix-like operating system, came on the scene with a Usenet posting in 1991 by its author, Linus Torvalds Strictly speaking, Linux is a kernel and not an operating system, because what Torvalds developed was the piece that allows other programs to run Most of these other programs that allow the system to be truly usable came from the GNU project Hence, many people refer to Linux as GNU/Linux when speaking of it as an entire OS, but since this subject is a bit of a religious war, we won t discuss it further here From these humble, hobbyist beginnings in 1991, Linux grew to a 10 release in 1994 But even before the 10 release, a number of Linux distributions were developed, combining the Linux kernel with applications and system utilities Some examples of today s popular distributions are Red Hat, Ubuntu, Debian, SUSE, and Gentoo Although many aspects of all Linux distributions are identical or very similar, they included some differences as well, such as package management and the init system Support models differ as well, and when you pay for a Linux distribution, you re typically paying for the support because the software itself is free This free software, combined with the ability to run on generic x86/64-bit based hardware, has made Linux a compelling choice for both enterprise and personal computing needs NOTE As you can see from this history, there are many variations of the Unix and Linux OSs Although the information and concepts in this chapter are generic and applicable to all versions, it would take more space than is feasible to note the nuances for each *nix version This chapter therefore focuses on Solaris (Unix) and Red Hat (Linux), where version-specific commands and examples are required
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