qr code programmieren java The Facelets Pages in Java

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The Facelets Pages
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Let s start with the page listed as the <welcome-file> in webxml: registerxhtml The rendered appearance of this page is shown in Figure 2-3
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FIGURE 2-3 The JSFReg welcome page
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Building a Simple JavaServer Faces Application
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<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 10 Transitional//EN" "http://wwww3org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitionaldtd"> <html xmlns="http://wwww3org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:h="http://javasuncom/jsf/html" xmlns:f="http://javasuncom/jsf/core"> <h:head> <title>A Simple JavaServer Faces Registration Application</title> </h:head> <h:body> <h:form> <h2>JSF Registration App</h2> <h4>Registration Form</h4> <table> <tr> <td>First Name:</td> <td> <h:inputText label="First Name" id="fname" value="#{userBeanfirstName}" required="true"/> <h:message for="fname" /> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>Last Name:</td> <td> <h:inputText label="Last Name" id="lname" value="#{userBeanlastName}" required="true"/> <h:message for="lname" /> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>Sex:</td> <td> <h:selectOneRadio label="Sex" id="sex" value="#{userBeansex}" required="true"> <f:selectItem itemLable="Male" itemValue="male" /> <f:selectItem itemLable="Female" itemValue="female" /> </h:selectOneRadio> <h:message for="sex" /> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>Date of Birth:</td> <td> <h:inputText label="Date of Birth" id="dob" value="#{userBeandob}" required="true"> <f:convertDateTime pattern="MM-dd-yy" /> </h:inputText> (mm-dd-yy) <h:message for="dob" /> </td> </tr>
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<tr> <td>Email Address:</td> <td> <h:inputText label="Email Address" id="email" value="#{userBeanemail}" required="true" validator="#{userBeanvalidateEmail}"/> <h:message for="email" /> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>Service Level:</td> <td> <h:selectOneMenu label="Service Level" value="#{userBeanserviceLevel}"> <f:selectItem itemLabel="Medium" itemValue="medium" /> <f:selectItem itemLabel="Basic" itemValue="basic" /> <f:selectItem itemLabel="Premium" itemValue="premium" /> </h:selectOneMenu> </td> </tr> </table> <p><h:messages /></p> <p><h:commandButton value="Register" action="confirm" /></p> </h:form> </h:body> </html>
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The first thing to notice are the three XML namespace directives at the top of the page, within the <html> element:
<html xmlns="http://wwww3org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:h="http://javasuncom/jsf/html" xmlns:f="http://javasuncom/jsf/core">
The first is standard practice for XHTML pages The second two directives allow the Facelets page to use the JSF Core and HTML tag libraries that are provided in the JSF specification, which in turn allows the Facelets page to use the underlying JSF UI components in the page Keep in mind that JSF UI components are client-independent and can be used in different clients as long as there are corresponding renderers The specifics on UI component rendering will be covered in later chapters, but for now, the main thing to know is that JSF is designed to work not only with traditional HTML browsers as the client, but with other types of clients as well, such as PDAs and other devices After the namespace directives, the next thing you ll notice are the <h:head> and <h:body> elements These are new with JSF 20 and cause the <head> and <body> markup required of all XHTML pages to be rendered Note that you could just as easily use the regular XHTML markup instead of the JSF components, but it is good practice to use the JSF components wherever possible These components are useful when pages need to include JavaScript or CSS, as will be described in 12 Next is the <h:form> tag This tag is required to be the parent tag for all JSF UI components that can participate in an HTML form submission, such as buttons and text fields We ll cover this in more detail in later chapters, but just remember that a JSF page is rendered for a client
2:
Building a Simple JavaServer Faces Application
(such as a browser), and an identical component tree is instantiated into memory on the server with the View component at its root You ll also notice that an HTML table is used to provide the layout structure of the form As we ll cover later on, JSF also has components that provide layout structure as well, such as <h:panelGrid>, which provides a similar layout to an HTML table but without requiring row and cell tags There is no requirement, however, to use one approach or the other Moving on to the first real, usable UI components, you see:
<h:inputText label="First Name" id="fname" value="#{userBeanfirstName}" required="true"/> <h:message for="fname" />
PARTIII PART PART
In order to require the user to enter a value, you ll notice the required attribute is set to true If the user attempts to leave the field blank while submitting the form, a built-in validation error message will appear exactly in the same location as the <h:message> tag Notice that the message tag can actually reside anywhere in the page because it is linked to the inputText field by its ID fname This is an example of some of the built-in validation mechanisms provided by JSF Notice the label attribute The value of this attribute will be shown as the label next to the message telling the user that a value is required for this field The next and most important thing to notice is the value attribute of the inputText tag: #{userBeanfirstName} This is known as a JSF value expression and provides direct linkage to the firstName property of the managed bean userBean So what is a managed bean You may have heard the terms inversion of control or dependency injection These are simply fancy terms for a way to hook together different parts of your application without introducing too much interdependence ( tight coupling ) Managed beans do just that Basically, a managed bean is an officially registered Java class for a JSF application It is a POJO (Plain Old Java Object) that conforms to JavaBeans naming conventions In order for a JSF application to refer to Java classes, and their methods and properties, it has to be available in the Java classpath and registered in faces-configxml or with the appropriate annotation Here are the Java language annotations that declare the class UserBean should be exposed as a managed bean in the application
@ManagedBean @SessionScoped public class UserBean {
The @ManagedBean annotation may have a name attribute, but if this is omitted, the system will take the unqualified Java classname, lowercase the first letter, and use the result as the name In this case, the result is userBean The equivalent faces-configxml syntax for managed beans will be described in 5 Once registered, a managed bean can be referred to in any UI component attribute using JSF value expressions Finally, notice the @SessionScoped annotation; this is similar but not exactly identical to the scope setting of a standard JSP <jsp:useBean> directive that allows the developer to control the lifespan of the Java class by designating it with one of the following settings: request, view, session, application, or none
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