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Once you have packaged your application as a war or exploded war, follow the steps for deploying it in the container of your choice Web Application runtimes, such as Tomcat and Glassfish support the deployment of war files and exploded war directories If you choose to deploy an exploded war, you will have the added benefit of being able to edit your xhtml files while the application is deployed and see the result of your changes simply by reloading the page in the browser When using this development style, take care to ensure that any changes you make to the source files are preserved outside of the exploded war directory The default network port for most containers is 8080; therefore, we will use that port in all the example URLs in this book Furthermore, we will assume that the server is running on the same computer on which the example is developed The TCP network stack ensures the hostname localhost refers to this computer To access the JSFReg application, point your browser to http://localhost:8080/jsfreg/ You ll notice that the name of your war file or exploded war directory name is used for the URL of your application Because you packaged the application in a file called jsfregwar, /jsfreg/ is used in the application s URL When you first access the http://localhost:8080/jsfreg/ URL, the <welcome-file>faces/ registerxhtml</welcome-file> statement in webxml will redirect the browser to the URL http://localhost:8080/jsfreg/faces/registerxhtml
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Before moving on to the more advanced features of JavaServer Faces technology, let s quickly review the core areas of JavaServer Faces discussed in the process of building the JSFReg application A JSF application is essentially a standard Java EE Web application but with the following specific aspects: A specific configuration in the webxml file that specifies the Faces Controller servlet and its url-pattern A collection of Facelets xhtml files One or more managed Java Objects These can be simple JSF Managed Beans, annotated with the @ManagedBean annotation or declared with the <managed-bean> element in a faces-configxml file They can also be Spring Beans, Enterprise JavaBeans, or several other kinds of managed Java Objects In building this example application, you have seen that basic JSF development is a straightforward process, which typically involves: Building Java classes and adding them as JSF managed beans Creating Facelets pages to contain JSF UI component tags that are bound to the managed bean s properties and methods Defining how the user will traverse from page to page within the application
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The JSFReg example used the Standard HTML UI components provided in the JSF Reference Implementation to build a registration form with different types of input fields, menus, and buttons that were bound to a managed bean s properties and methods For JSFReg we specified both built-in validation and data conversion for the input fields A custom validation method was also built and associated with an e-mail input field to validate an e-mail address Finally, we devised a basic navigation model and bound the command buttons and links to these navigation cases Now that you have seen a complete, working example, you should have a solid understanding of the basic structure of a JSF application It s now time to move on to more advanced aspects of JavaServer Faces
PARTIII PART PART
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CHAPTER
The JavaServer Faces Request Processing Lifecycle
he preceding chapter presented a simple example of a JavaServer Faces application and introduced many of the practical aspects of JSF There is, however, another important part of JSF that must be discussed before we can begin an in-depth examination of each JSF feature This is the request processing lifecycle The request processing lifecycle serves as the behind-the-scenes engine that makes JavaServer Faces possible This chapter examines the key concepts behind the JavaServer Faces request processing lifecycle and explains how it processes Web requests in a well-defined, event-based manner A thorough understanding of the request processing lifecycle is important because its various phases will be referred to numerous times in later chapters where more advanced JSF development topics are covered
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