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ExpressionFactory expressionFactory = applicationgetExpressionFactory( ); ValueExpression ve =expressionFactorycreateValueExpression(elContext, "#{userBeanuserid}",Stringclass); userId = (String) vegetValue(elContext); vesetValue(elContext, "newUserId");
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Note that the entire UserBean instance can be retrieved by using the expression #{userBean} without any properties, as shown here:
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ExpressionFactory expressionFactory = applicationgetExpressionFactory( ); ValueExpression ve =expressionFactorycreateValueExpression(elContext, "#{userBean }",UserBeanclass); UserBean user = (UserBean) vegetValue(elContext);
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Once you have the reference to an actual UserBean instance, you can naturally call its methods as normal
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Invoking a Method on a Managed Bean Programmatically
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In addition to just accessing values of managed bean properties, JSF also provides a way to invoke a method of a managed bean For example, if you want to execute the method addConfirmedUser( ), which was introduced in the JSFReg application in 2, you would use the following:
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Application application = FacesContextgetCurrentInstance()getApplication(); ExpressionFactory expressionFactory = applicationgetExpressionFactory( ); MethodExpression me = expressionFactory createMethodExpression(elContext,"#{UserBeanaddConfirmedUser}", Voidclass, null); try { meinvoke(context, null); }
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catch (ELException e) { Throwable wrapped = egetCause( ); }
PARTIII PART PART
Notice in the previous code listing that the method addConfirmedUser( ) did not take any arguments so the second argument of invoke( ) was null However, if the addConfirmedUser( ) method accepted arguments that included a custom UserInfo object as well as an Id of type String, the method expression code would be as follows:
Object result = null; MethodExpression me = expressionFactory createMethodExpression(elContext, "#{UserBeanaddConfirmedUser }", Voidclass new Class [] { UserInfoclass, Stringclass} ); try { result = mbinvoke(context, new Object [] { UserInfo(),"joeshmoe" }); } catch (ELException e) { Throwable wrapped = egetCause( ); }
Notice also that it is possible to retrieve the results of a method binding invocation shown here using result to store the return value Here is how this method invocation is done:
elContext = contextgetElContext(); MethodExpression me = expressionFactorycreateMethodExpression(elContext, "#{UserBeanaddConfirmedUser }", VoidTYPE, new Class [] { UserInfoclass, Stringclass}); try { result = meinvoke(elContext, new Object [] { UserInfo(), "joeshmoe" }); } catch (ELException ele) { Throwable wrapped = elegetCause(); }
Note that any exception thrown by the invoked method is wrapped in an ELException in the Faces 12 Unified EL The cause must be extracted from these exceptions to see what really happened in the invoked method Further coverage of accessing managed beans programmatically is provided in 10, where the Virtual Trainer example application is reviewed in detail
Using Managed Beans as Backing Beans for JSF Pages
Users of Microsoft Visual Basic or ASPNet are familiar with the notion of having an associated source code file (or class) that provides the back-end plumbing that handles events, updates data, and so on for a specific page This is known as the backing bean concept, and although not specifically required by the Faces specification, it is fully supported and recommended in
Part I:
The JavaServer Faces Framework
most cases In fact, several JSF-enabled integrated development environments (IDEs) enable or, in some cases, force this programming style on the developer (You will see examples of this in 17 when we examine JSF development with several JSF-enabled IDEs) To implement a backing bean approach in JSF, you can create a Java class for each JSF page and register it as a managed bean It is recommended that backing beans be declared to be in request scope The most preferred usage is to have a single backing bean per page although this is not enforced by any specification A common usage is also to name the class the same name as the page For example, loginjsp would have an associated backing bean of Loginjava Placing the backing bean classes in a subpackage of backing is also useful Finally, the backing beans can also be registered in the faces-configxml file with _Backing added to their names so you always know which beans are backing beans In general, the backing bean holds the following artifacts for a page: Properties corresponding to input fields on a page, such as string properties for userid and password Action methods and action listeners that correspond to UI components that initiate action events, such as clicking Register or Next Page Declarations of UI component instances that can be directly bound to the UI components used on the page (We ll drill down on this usage in more detail in 7) In short, it is the responsibility of the backing bean to serve as a conduit from the page to server-side application logic In other words, it serves as the middle man between the page and the back-end business logic A typical set of pages and their corresponding backing beans that link to back-end business logic is shown in Figure 5-3 To get a better idea of how the backing bean concept works, consider a typical login example In this example you could have a page (loginjsp), which is built with a collection of UIInput components (input fields) to accept the login credentials In this example, the backing bean can be a Java class, Loginjava, which has a corresponding set of JavaBean properties (of type String) for temporarily storing the user s login credentials To handle the user s button click on a Login button (UICommand), an action method, checkUserCredentials( ), could be invoked It could then call a back-end business method that performs a database or
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