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Figure 18-19. A single block is used in the Distance program. Before I use this CONSTANT block I need to create a constant that will hold the distance (in inches) between the STARTING LINE and FINISH LINE. To do this I click on the Edit menu and select the Define Constants option. A window appears, as shown in Figure 18-20.
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Figure 18-20. Create a constant to hold a value available to other programs. Now I need to provide a name and data type for the constant. I click the Create button (see Figure 18-20) and enter StartToFinish for the Name, and I select Number from the Data Type drop-down menu and enter a value (24 for this example) in the Value section, as shown in Figure 18-21.
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Figure 18-21. Provide a name, data type, and a value for the constant.
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Click the OK button and then click the Close button to close the Edit Constants window. Now, click on the single CONSTANT block in your program (see Figure 18-19) and select the Choose From List option in its configuration panel. The new constant, StartToFinish, is listed in the right column of the configuration panel. Click on it to select it. Save the program (name it Distance ) and upload it to the brick. Now it s time to create Program 1 that will use the value stored in the constant StartToFinish. I ll create a new program called Program1 and drop in a CONSTANT block, as shown in Figure 18-22.
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Figure 18-22. A new program s CONSTANT block configuration panel Notice in Figure 18-22 that I can define a new constant by simply entering the name of the constant in the Name section and selecting the Data Type from the drop-down menu (rather than selecting Define Constants from the Edit menu). But because I ve already configured a constant named StartToFinish and uploaded it to my brick I want to select the Choose from list option shown in Figure 18-22. When I select that option, a list of available constants is displayed on the right side of the configuration panel, as shown in Figure 18-23.
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Figure 18-23. Select a constant from the list.
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If you ll remember, the function of Program 1 was to have your robot roll forward the total distance minus four rotations before doing a dance. Before we knew about the CONSTANT block, we would simply have dropped in a MOVE block and configured it to roll the robot forward for 20 rotations. But now, we can use the CONSTANT block (that s holding a value of 24) with a MATH block to do a little calculation. I ll cover the MATH block in more detail in 20, but for now just know that the MATH block can be used to add, subtract, multiply, and more. Figure 18-24 shows that I ll be using it to take the CONSTANT block s value (24) and subtract four from it. I first drag a data wire out of the CONSTANT block and into the input plug A for the MATH block. I ve also used the MATH block s configuration panel to set the value of B to four and configured the Operation to perform a Subtraction operation. B will be subtracted from A and that value will be supplied to a MOVE block.
Figure 18-24. The CONSTANT block provides its value to the MATH block. Next, I drop in a MOVE block configured for Rotations and drag a data wire out of the MATH block and into the MOVE block s Duration data plug. This is shown in Figure 18-25.
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Figure 18-25. The MOVE block will get its Duration value from the MATH block. Now all that s left is to drop in a few MOVE blocks to get the robot to dance and then roll forward four rotations to the FINISH LINE. (I ll leave that up to you to program make it as simple or as complex a dance as you like.) With Program 2, you ll create a similar program but you can use the MATH block to divide the value provided by the CONSTANT block by two (divide it in half) and send that value to the MOVE block. Program 3 will use a MATH block to divide the CONSTANT block value by four and send that value to the MOVE block (1/4 the total distance). So, why not simply use a bunch of MOVE blocks instead of the CONSTANT and MATH blocks Think about this what happens now when I change the total distance between the STARTING LINE and FINISH LINE to 48 Or 100 With MOVE blocks, you ll need to open up all three programs (Program 1, 2, and 3) and change the values in the specific MOVE blocks. But not with CONSTANT blocks. Now, all I need to do is open up the original program titled Distance and change the value (24) to the new distance. I save the program, upload it to my brick, and run the program. Now the constant value has been changed, and Programs 1, 2, and 3 do not have to be opened and modified. They will each take the current value stored in the constant StartToFinish and use it to calculate the proper distance to move. Cool, huh
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