The Migration from IPv4 to IPv6 in Objective-C

Creation QR in Objective-C The Migration from IPv4 to IPv6

The Migration from IPv4 to IPv6
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Low initial cost: No preparatory work is necessary to begin the migration to IPv6 Mechanisms used by SIT include the following: A structure of IPv6 addresses that allows the derivation of IPv6 addresses from IPv4 addresses The availability of the dual stack on hosts and on routers during the transition that is, the presence of both IPv4 and IPv6 stacks at the same time A technique to encapsulate IPv6 packets inside IPv4 packets (tunneling) to allow IPv6 packets to traverse clouds not yet updated to IPv6 An optional technique that consists of translating IPv6 headers into IPv4 headers and vice versa to allow, in an advanced phase of the migration, IPv4-only nodes to communicate with IPv6-only nodes The SIT approach guarantees that IPv6 hosts can interoperate with IPv4 hosts initially on the entire Internet When the migration is completed, this interoperability will be locally guaranteed for a long time This capability allows for the protection of investments made on IPv4; simple devices that cannot be updated to IPv6 for example, network printers and terminal servers will continue to operate with IPv4 until they are no longer used The possibility of a gradual migration allows manufacturers to integrate IPv6 in routers, operating systems, and network software when they think that implementations are stable and users to begin the migration at a time they consider the most appropriate Migration problems are described in RFC 19331 The following sections of this chapter are dedicated to describing these problems
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Tunneling
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As we mentioned in the introduction, while the IPv6 routing infrastructure is being deployed, the routing will continue to be based on IPv4 Tunneling techniques (see also Section 756) allow use of IPv4 networks to carry the IPv6 traffic Hosts and routers supporting the dual stack (also called IPv4/IPv6 nodes) can use tunnels to route IPv6 packets over IPv4 regions, as shown
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in the example in Figure 12-1 In this example, host A sends the native IPv6 packet to router R1, which retransmits the packet in an IPv4 tunnel to router R2, which finally transmits it as a native IPv6 packet to host B In this case, the tunnel is managed by R1 and R2 From the encapsulation point of view, implementing a tunnel means encapsulating an IPv6 packet inside an IPv4 packet, as shown in Figure 12-2 In the example shown in Figure 12-2, the IPv6 header will contain addresses A and B, and the IPv4 header will contain addresses R1 and R2
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1211 Alternative Tunneling Schemes
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During the migration, the tunneling technique can be used in the following ways: Router-to-router: IPv6/IPv4 routers interconnected by an IPv4 infrastructure can tunnel IPv6 packets between themselves See Figure 12-3(a) Host-to-router: IPv6/IPv4 hosts can tunnel IPv6 packets to an intermediary IPv6/IPv4 router that can be reached via an IPv4 infrastructure See Figure 12-3(b) Host-to-host: IPv6/IPv4 hosts that are interconnected by an IPv4 infrastructure can tunnel IPv6 packets between themselves See Figure 12-3(c)
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Figure 12-1 IPv6 over Ipv4 Tunneling
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Figure 12-2 IPv6 over IPv4 Encapsulation
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The Migration from IPv4 to IPv6
Router-to-host: IPv6/IPv4 routers can use tunnels to reach an IPv6/IPv4 host via an IPv4 infrastructure See Figure 12-3(d) In the first two tunneling methods router-to-router and host-to-router the IPv6 packet is tunneled to a router; therefore, the endpoint of this type of tunnel is a router that must decode the IPv6 packet and forward it to its final destination No relationship exists between the router address and the final destination address For this reason, the router address that is the tunnel endpoint must be manually configured This type of tunnel is called a configured tunnel In the last two tunneling methods host-to-host and router-to-host the IPv6/IPv4 packet is tunneled from a host or from a router to its destination host In this case, the tunnel endpoint address and the destination host address are the same If the IPv6 address used for the destination node is an IPv4-compatible address (see Section 468), the tunnel endpoint IPv4 address can be automatically derived from the IPv6 address, and therefore no manual configurations are necessary These tunnels are also called automatic tunnels
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