<af:outputText binding="#{pprbeanoutput}" partialTriggers="input1"/> in Java

Maker Data Matrix in Java <af:outputText binding="#{pprbeanoutput}" partialTriggers="input1"/>

<af:outputText binding="#{pprbeanoutput}" partialTriggers="input1"/>
ECC200 Maker In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in Java applications.
Recognize Data Matrix 2d Barcode In Java
Using Barcode scanner for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
Notice that the input field ID is used by the output field and is assigned to the partialTriggers attribute This attribute can also contain multiple space-separated IDs to establish dependencies on multiple fields Finally, to demonstrate that only the interdependent fields are being refreshed and not the entire page, you can use another outputText field that is value-bound to the currentTime property of the managed bean (Notice the use of the ADF Faces convertDateTime to display the current time)
Painting Barcode In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create bar code image in Java applications.
Bar Code Reader In Java
Using Barcode reader for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
<af:outputText value="#{pprbeancurrentTime}" > <af:convertDateTime type="time" timeStyle="long"/> </af:outputText>
Make Data Matrix ECC200 In Visual C#
Using Barcode encoder for .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Data Matrix ECC200 Drawer In VS .NET
Using Barcode creation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in ASP.NET applications.
As shown in Figure B-1, when a user changes a value in the input field and then tabs out of the field, a partial submit occurs and only the dependent output field is updated However, the output field displaying the current time does not refresh The preceding example was used purely to explain the procedures for enabling PPR in ADF Faces applications This same approach can be applied to the more complex ADF Faces components, such as table and treeTable, which can use PPR in a similar fashion
DataMatrix Generation In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in VS .NET applications.
Generate ECC200 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode creation for VS .NET Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in .NET applications.
Appendix B:
Bar Code Creator In Java
Using Barcode encoder for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
Barcode Generator In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
Third-Party JSF Component Libraries
Generating UPC Code In Java
Using Barcode drawer for Java Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 5 image in Java applications.
Make Code 39 In Java
Using Barcode drawer for Java Control to generate, create Code-39 image in Java applications.
FIGURE B-1 PPR in action: Only the output eld is refreshed
Generate Identcode In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create Identcode image in Java applications.
Generate ANSI/AIM Code 128 In .NET
Using Barcode generator for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in Reporting Service applications.
Adding PPR to Non ADF Faces Components
EAN13 Generation In None
Using Barcode generation for Office Word Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in Office Word applications.
GS1 128 Creation In None
Using Barcode generator for Office Word Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in Office Word applications.
You may be surprised to find out that in addition to ADF Faces components supporting PPR, it is also possible to enable non-ADF Faces components to support PPR as well While non-ADF Faces components don t necessarily have the partialTriggers attribute, it is possible to programmatically assign a partial trigger (target) programmatically For example, it is possible to use a standard h:outputText to display the value entered in the input field (via PPR) from our previous example instead of an af:outputText To do this, we could replace the af:outputText with an h:outputText
Code-39 Generation In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create Code 3/9 image in Software applications.
UPC-A Creator In Java
Using Barcode creator for Eclipse BIRT Control to generate, create UPC A image in BIRT applications.
<h:outputText id="std_output" binding="#{pprbeanstdOutput}"/>
Code 39 Recognizer In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode recognizer for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Generate Barcode In Objective-C
Using Barcode drawer for iPhone Control to generate, create bar code image in iPhone applications.
Notice that the new h:outputText is also bound to a backing bean property, so this would require adding the property stdOutput of type HtmlOutputText (along with setters and getters) to the backing bean Also notice that in order to programmatically assign a partial trigger, the component must have its id set Next, in the code that handles the ValueChangeEvent, we simply add a statement to enable PPR for the standard output field and then set its value based on the input field s value as was done before:
public void handleValueChange(ValueChangeEvent vce) { // No longer needed - outputsetValue(inputgetValue()); // Add partial target programmatically to stdOutput component AdfFacesContextgetCurrentInstance()addPartialTarget(stdOutput); stdOutputsetValue(inputgetValue()); }
PART V
Part V:
Appendixes
The ADF Faces processScope
To simplify and provide a consistent method for interpage communication, ADF Faces provides the processScope Before JavaServer Faces, interpage communication was often done by simply providing an extra request parameter argument, such as rowid=99 For very simple applications, where noncomplex data-types are needed to be stored between page viewings, this provided a solution However, it has the problem of being easily hacked because the variables are exposed in the request string The other common approach was to use the HttpSession to store objects as sessionscoped variables instead It involved placing an object onto the HttpSession, such as a shopping cart with items This had the benefit of being able to store complex data-types; however, other problems can arise, like the following: Multiple windows, such as when using HTML frames, cause problems with session-scoped variables since both pages could be operating on the same sessionscoped variable Pressing the Back button can cause problems because the page you are navigating back to might rely on a session-scoped variable that may have changed in the page you came from The ADF Faces processScope feature is aimed at eliminating or reducing these problems In short, the ADF Faces processScope provides an additional scope to the existing Faces applicationScope, sessionScope, and requestScope objects As with the oft-used sessionScope, developers are able to store values/objects onto the processScope but without the previously mentioned problems The key difference from the sessionScope is that the values stored onto the processScope are only visible from the user s current process This means that if a new window of the same page is displayed and subsequent navigations occur, they will have an independent processScope from the original This automatically forks off another instance of the processScope Even better, if the user then clicks the Back button on the original page, the processScope is reset to its original state Retrieving and editing an item such as a Cart object that has an ItemCount property from the processScope can be done using the following code in an action method:
public String incrementCart_action() { (other code) // retrieve "Cart" object from processScope AdfFacesContext afctx = AdfFacesContextgetCurrentInstance(); Cart pscart = (Cart) afctxgetProcessScope()get("cart"); // Update itemcount value in Cart int current = pscartgetItemcount(); current++; // Create new instance of Cart and set new itemcount Cart newcart = new Cart(); newcartsetItemcount(current); //place new Cart back onto processScope afctxgetProcessScope()put("cart", newcart); return "proceed"; }
Appendix B:
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.