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In the preceding section, we made mention of rule-specification (rule-spec) The rule-spec is the list of rules that are used by Netfilter to match on a packet If the specified rule-spec matches a packet, Netfilter will apply the desired action on it The following iptables parameters make up the common rule-specs: p [!] protocol This specifies the IP protocol to compare against You can use any protocol defined in the /etc/protocols file, such as tcp, udp, or
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icmp A built-in value for all indicates that all IP packets will match If the protocol is not defined in /etc/protocols, you can use the protocol number here For example, 47 represents gre The exclamation mark (!) negates the check Thus, specifying -p ! tcp means all packets that are not TCP If this option is not provided, Netfilter will assume all The --protocol option is an alias for this option An example of its usage is
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[root@serverA ~]# iptables -t filter -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
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For ip6tables, use
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[root@serverA ~]# ip6tables -t filter -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
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These rules will accept all packets destined to TCP port 80 on the INPUT chain s [!] address [/mask] This option specifies the source IP address to check against When combined with an optional netmask, the source IP can be compared against an entire netblock As with -p, the use of the exclamation mark (!) inverts the meaning of the rule Thus, specifying -s ! 1013172 means all packets not from 1013172 Note that the address and netmask can be abbreviated An example of its usage is
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[root@serverA ~]# iptables -t filter -A INPUT -s 17216/16 -j DROP
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This rule will drop all packets from the 1721600/16 network This is the same network as 1721600/25525500 To use ip6tables to drop all packets from the IPv6 network range 2001:DB8::/32, we would use a rule like:
[root@serverA ~]# ip6tables -t filter -A INPUT -s 2001:DB8::/32 -j DROP
d [!] address [/mask] This option specifies the destination IP address to check against When combined with an optional netmask, the destination IP can be compared against an entire netblock As with -s, the exclamation mark negates the rule, and the address and netmask can be abbreviated An example of its usage is
[root@serverA ~]# iptables -t filter -A FORWARD -d 10100930/24 -j ACCEPT
This rule will allow all packets going through the FORWARD chain that are destined for the 10100930/24 network j target This option specifies an action to jump to These actions are referred to as targets in iptables parlance The targets that we ve seen so far have been ACCEPT, DROP, and RETURN The first two accept and drop packets, respectively The third is related to the creation of additional chains As we saw in the preceding section, it is possible for you to create your own chains to help keep things organized and to accommodate more complex
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rules If iptables is evaluating a set of rules in a chain that is not built-in, the RETURN target will tell iptables to return back to the parent chain Using the earlier to_net10 example, when iptables reaches the -j RETURN, it goes back to processing the FORWARD chain where it left off If iptables sees the RETURN action in one of the built-in chains, it will execute the default rule for the chain Additional targets can be loaded via Netfilter modules For example, the REJECT target can be loaded with ipt_REJECT, which will drop the packet and return an ICMP error packet back to the sender Another useful target is ipt_REDIRECT, which can make a packet be destined to the NAT host itself even if the packet is destined for somewhere else i interface This option specifies the name of the interface on which a packet was received This is handy for instances where special rules should be applied if a packet arrives from a physical location, such as a DMZ interface For example, if eth1 is your DMZ interface and you want to allow it to send packets to the host at 10432, you can use
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