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PART II
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Many Web designers, however, are not comfortable with this shared control and may attempt to use fixed sizes and fixed positions, resort to !important, or even implement other technological overrides using Flash or images Forcing appearance is not in the best interest of usability For example, if you can force a particular layout or font size, what happens to the user with poor eyesight who really needs to adjust things in order to read the content The Web is not print, and forcing inflexible designs on end users will not always be met with success
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Part II:
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Document Structure and CSS Inheritance
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As discussed in 1, (X)HTML documents have an implicit structure The structure of the document is generally presented as a tree, as you have seen in a number of the examples in this chapter For example, the document shown here would have a tree structure like the one shown in Figure 4-9:
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<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"> <title>Test File</title> </head> <body> <h1>Test</h1> <p>This is a <strong>Test</strong>!</p> </body> </html>
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In the example parse tree, note how the <strong> tag is a child of the <p> tag, which is in the <body>, which is in the <html> tag What happens if you set a style rule to p elements, as follows
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p {color: red;}
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body h1 p strong
FIGURE 4-9
Simple document parse tree
4:
Introduction to CSS
Would the contents of the <strong> tag enclosed in the <p> tag also be red The answer is yes, because the color is inherited from the parent element:
p {color:red;} body h1 p strong Red
PART II
Whereas most elements can inherit the style features of their parents, some style properties do not inherit For example, consider setting the border property of the paragraph like so:
p {border: solid;}
If the enclosed <strong> tag from the previous example inherited the border, you would expect to see something like this:
This is a test
However, this does not happen; the border is limited just to the paragraph itself because the
inheriting properties Assuming that a property does inherit, it is still possible to override the inheritance of a property For example, consider the following two rules:
p {color: red; font-size: xx-large;} strong {color: yellow;}
border value is not inherited The reference in 5 will point out important non-
In this case, the color of the text within the <strong> tag would be yellow and have an xxlarge size Both of the properties were inherited, but the color property was overridden by the color rule for the <strong> tag, which is more specific:
p {color:red; font-size: xx-large} strong {color: yellow;} body p strong Red, xx-large Override Inherit Yellow, xx-large
Part II:
Core Style
The combination of multiple rules, with elements inheriting some properties and overriding others, is the idea of the cascade that CSS is named for The general idea of the cascade, in effect, is that it provides a system to sort out which rules apply to a document that has many style sheets For example, a rule for a specific <p> tag marked with an id attribute is more powerful than a class rule applied to <p>, which in turn is more powerful than a rule for the p element itself Inline styles set with a style attribute are more important than a document-wide style or linked style An easy way to think about which rule wins is to follow these helpful rules of thumb: The more specific the rule the more powerful The closer the rule is to the tag the more powerful So with these rules, we see that id rules are more specific than class rules and thus will override them Inline styles are closer to tags than document-wide or external style rules and thus take precedence, and so on
TIP There is an actual process to determine the specificity of a particular rule versus another by
assigning numeric values to each rule, but if a designer requires such a careful analysis of the style rules to determine an end result, the style sheet is simply too complex
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