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Managing Groups from the Command Line
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In this exercise, you will practice creating and modifying groups from the shell prompt of your Linux system Suppose your company is putting together a new research and development team that will be using your Linux system You need to create a new group for users who will be members of this team Complete the following: 1 Verify that you are logged in to your system 2 If necessary, switch to your root user account with the su command 3 Create a new group named research by doing the following: a At the shell prompt, enter groupadd research b Add your user account and the dtracy user account (created in the previous exercise) to the research group by entering groupmod A dtracy,your_username research at the shell prompt c Verify the users were added to the group by entering tail /etc/group at the shell prompt
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Manage Ownership, Permissions, and Quotas
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Now that you know how to create, delete, and modify Linux users and groups, we need to add additional components to our security equation: ownership, permissions, and quotas
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Recall that earlier in this chapter we identified two tasks we need to accomplish when working with Linux:
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Control who can access the system Define what users can do after they have logged in to the system
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We addressed the first point in the preceding topics We control who accesses the system by implementing users and groups In this part of this chapter, we re going to address the second point We need to define what users can do after they have logged in to the system We re going to do this by discussing the following topics:
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Managing ownership Managing permissions Implementing disk quotas
Let s begin by discussing file and directory ownership
Managing Ownership
To effectively control who can do what in the file system, you need to first consider who owns files and directories We re going to discuss the following in this regard:
How ownership works Managing ownership from the command line
Let s start by discussing how ownership works
7: Working with Linux Users and Groups
How Ownership Works
Anytime a user creates a new file or directory, his or her user account is assigned as that file or directory s owner For example, suppose the ksanders user logs in to her Linux system and creates a file named contactsodt using OpenOfficeorg in her home directory Because she created this file, ksanders is automatically assigned ownership of contactsodt By right-clicking on this file in the system s graphical user interface and selecting Properties | Permissions, you can view who owns the file This is shown in Figure 7-24 Notice in Figure 7-24 that there are two owners for contactsodt The first is the name of the user who owns the file In this case, it s ksanders In addition, the group
FIGURE 7-24
Viewing file ownership in the Linux GUI
Manage Ownership, Permissions, and Quotas
FIGURE 7-25
Viewing file ownership from the command line
users owns the file as well That s because the primary group that ksanders belongs to is users You can also view file ownership from the command line using the ls l command This has been done in ksanders home directory in Figure 7-25 Notice in Figure 7-25 that the third column in the output displays the name of the file or directory s owner (ksanders) while the fourth column displays the name of the group that owns it (users) While file and directory ownership is automatically assigned at creation, it can be modified Let s discuss how this is done next
Managing Ownership from the Command Line
File and directory ownership isn t a fixed entity Even though ownership is automatically assigned at creation, it can be modified You can specify a different user and/or group as the owner of a given file or directory To change the user who owns a file, you must be logged in as root To change the group that owns a file, you must be logged in as root or as the user who currently owns the file This can be done with either graphical or command-line tools Staying true to the form of this chapter, we re going to focus on command-line utilities, including the following:
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