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You should begin this task by outlining exactly what the script should do and in what order A flowchart or sticky-notes on the wall work well for this task Once done, you should create a new file using a text editor The file should have a descriptive name such as mntdev Then enter the following lines in the file:
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#!/bin/bash #A script to mount removable media echo "Which device do you want to mount " echo "A Floppy Diskette" echo "E CD Disc" read MYCHOICE case $MYCHOICE in a | A ) mount t vfat /dev/fd0 /media/floppy mount |grep fd0 ls /media/floppy ;; e | E ) mount t iso9660 /dev/cdrom /media/cdrom mount |grep cdrom ls /media/cdrom ;; * ) echo "Sorry, that's not a valid device" ;; esac exit 0
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At this point, you could enter /bin/bash /mntdev at the shell prompt to verify that it works correctly Once you ve fixed all the bugs, you can then make the file executable by entering chmod u+x /mntdev at the shell prompt At this point, you need to decide whether or not you want to be able to run the file without specifying its full path at the shell prompt If you don t want to use the full path, then you can move the script to a directory already contained in your PATH environment variable Alternatively, you could also add the current directory to your PATH environment variable and export it
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Managing Linux Processes and Services
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1001 1002 1003 Describe How Linux Handles Processes Manage Running Processes Schedule Processes
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10: Managing Linux Processes and Services
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ou ve learned a great deal about Linux so far in this book We started off easy, learning about the historical origins of Linux and the different roles it can play in your organization As we ve progressed through each chapter, you ve been introduced to increasingly more challenging Linux concepts and skills In the last chapter, we really ratcheted things up when we talked about creating shell scripts In this chapter, we re going to build on the previous chapter by talking about how the Linux operating system handles executable programs and scripts when they are run Then we ll spend some time learning how to manage executables while they are running on the system We ll discuss the following topics:
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How Linux handles processes Managing running processes Scheduling processes
INSIDE THE EXAM
Managing Linux Processes and Services
For your Linux+ exam, you need to be very familiar with how Linux handles running processes You need to understand the heredity of Linux processes as well as the difference between user processes and system processes (daemons) You should know how to use shell commands to view processes running on the system You need to know how to run a process in the foreground and in the background You should also know how to kill a process from the command line Finally, you need to know how to use at and cron to configure a service to run automatically in the future
Describe How Linux Handles Processes
Let s begin this chapter by discussing how Linux handles processes
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Describe How Linux Handles Processes
The key to being able to effectively manage Linux processes is to first understand how processes function within the operating system In this part of this chapter, we re going to discuss the following:
What exactly is a process The heredity of Linux processes
Let s begin by discussing what a process is
What Exactly Is a Process
So, what exactly is a process This term tends to be used in a variety of different ways in the computing industry, so it can be difficult sometimes to nail down exactly what it means In this part of this chapter we ll help you understand what a process is by discussing the following:
Processes defined Types of processes
Processes Defined
For our purposes here, a process is a program that has been loaded from a long-term storage device, usually a hard disk drive, into system RAM and is currently being processed by the CPU on the motherboard Many different types of programs can be executed to create a process On your Linux system, the types of programs listed in Table 10-1 can be loaded into RAM and executed by the CPU Remember that the Linux operating system can run many processes concurrently on a single CPU Depending on how your Linux system is being used, it may have only a few processes running at a given point in time or it may have hundreds of processes running concurrently
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