vb net barcode printing code 11: Managing the Linux Boot Process in Software

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11: Managing the Linux Boot Process
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Configuring a Dual-Boot System Using GRUB
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Creating a dual-boot system with GRUB isn t very difficult at all, once you ve configured your system with enough free space for both operating systems The overall process is as follows: 1 Install your Windows operating system first, if it hasn t already been done Be sure to leave enough free (unpartitioned) space on the disk for the second operating system The order in which you install operating systems is fairly critical The key point to understand is that the bootloader of the last OS installed will be the one installed in the MBR when you re done If you install Linux second, the LILO or GRUB bootloader will be the last one installed in the MBR (overwriting the Windows bootloader that was installed there first) 2 Install your Linux operating system The installation routines for many Linux distributions will detect the existing operating system on the disk and automatically create a LILO or GRUB menu item for you that will launch it For example, in Figure 11-17, the SUSE Linux YaST installer identified the Windows operating system installed in the first disk partition and automatically added a menu item to GRUB for you However, the installer used by some distributions may not detect the presence of the other operating system in the existing partitions If this is the case, then you can manually add the appropriate lines to your LILO or GRUB configuration files I ve provided some examples you can use as a starting point in the next step Be warned, however, that some installers may try to delete the existing partition(s) by default in their partitioning proposals If you want to keep the existing operating system, you need to create a custom partitioning proposal that preserves the existing partition 3 Check your bootloader configuration file and verify that an entry for the new operating system has been created If you re using GRUB, you should see an entry similar to the following:
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title Windows chainloader (hd0,0)+1
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This points the system to the Windows kernel files located in the first partition of the first hard disk in the system The chainloader directive tells GRUB to turn control over to a different bootloader, which in this case,
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Con gure Linux Bootloaders
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FIGURE 11-17
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Adding a Windows menu item to GRUB
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would be NTLOADEREXE, located in the first partition of the first hard drive If your distribution uses LILO, you should see an entry similar to the following:
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other=/dev/hda1 label=WindowsXP
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Like GRUB, the Windows bootloader is divided into two parts One part is simply a pointer in the MBR The main part of the Windows bootloader resides in the Windows boot partition Using the configurations just specified, the GRUB or LILO bootloader simply points to the Windows bootloader in the Windows partition and turns control over to it to boot the system
11: Managing the Linux Boot Process
When you boot your system, you should see a new GRUB or LILO menu item added that allows you to boot Windows in addition to Linux, as shown in Figure 11-18 With this in mind, let s now discuss how to configure a dual-boot system using the Windows bootloader
Configuring a Dual-Boot System with NTLOADEREXE
As I mentioned earlier, creating a dual-boot system with a Linux bootloader is relatively easy However, creating a dual-boot system using the Windows bootloader (NTLOADEREXE) is not nearly so straightforward Here s what you need to do: 1 Install Windows first on the hard drive As before, be sure you leave plenty of extra unpartitioned space on your drive for Linux 2 Install Linux into the free space on the drive Be sure your Linux installer doesn t try to delete your Windows partition in the process In addition, be sure to install your Linux bootloader in the first sector of the partition that
FIGURE 11-18
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