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CHAPTER 11 SNAPSHOTBOT BUILD IT
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Figure 11-29. Start with these components for the camera cage.
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Figure 11-30. Place the small black connectors as shown.
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Figure 11-31. Connect the 11-hole beam to the other 11-hole beams as shown.
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Figure 11-32. Place the two 13-hole beams as shown.
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Figure 11-33. Connect the four gray pins to the camera cage body.
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Figure 11-34. Connect the four 7-hole beams to the gray pins and place two small black black connectors in the 11-hole beams.
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CHAPTER 11 SNAPSHOTBOT BUILD IT
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Figure 11-35. Connect the two 11-hole beams to the 7-hole beams on the camera cage body and place two small black connectors in the other 11-hole beam.
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Figure 11-36. Place the 11-hole beam on the cage and two small black connectors in the 15-hole beam.
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CHAPTER 11 SNAPSHOTBOT BUILD IT
Figure 11-37. Connect the 15-hole beam to the cage to hold the motor.
Figure 11-38. Connect the two gray components to the cage as shown.
CHAPTER 11 SNAPSHOTBOT BUILD IT
Figure 11-39. Spin the cage around and connect the two gray legs. Also place the small black connector as shown.
Figure 11-40. Connect the gray component. Place the blue connector and the small black connector as shown.
CHAPTER 11 SNAPSHOTBOT BUILD IT
Figure 11-41. Connect the 9-hole beam.
Figure 11-42. Spin the cage around and place the two small gray connectors as shown.
CHAPTER 11 SNAPSHOTBOT BUILD IT
Figure 11-43. Connect the 15-hole beam to the cage and snap the two small gray pins together.
Figure 11-44. Connect the two small gray pins to the Sound Sensor.
Figure 11-45. Tip the cage on its side as shown and connect the Sound Sensor.
CHAPTER 11 SNAPSHOTBOT BUILD IT
Figure 11-46. Place the three small black connectors.
Figure 11-47. Connect the motor to the 15-hole beam as shown.
Figure 11-48. Place the blue connector and small black connector in the gray component.
CHAPTER 11 SNAPSHOTBOT BUILD IT
Figure 11-49. Connect the gray component to the motor as shown. This is the arm that will press on the camera button.
Figure 11-50. Retrieve the main body so you can connect to the camera cage.
Figure 11-51. Connect the camera cage assembly to the main body as shown.
Figure 11-52. A 13-hole beam and two long black connectors will be used for reinforcement.
CHAPTER 11 SNAPSHOTBOT BUILD IT
Figure 11-53. Place the two long black connectors in the 13-hole beam as shown.
Figure 11-54. Connect the 13-hole beam to the main body.
Figure 11-55. A 15-hole beam and a black pin are used for reinforcement on the other side.
Figure 11-56. Insert the black pin in the 15-hole beam as shown.
CHAPTER 11 SNAPSHOTBOT BUILD IT
Figure 11-57. Connect the 15-hole beam to the main body.
Figure 11-58. The Sound Sensor and gray component will be needed.
Figure 11-59. Place the gray component as shown.
Figure 11-60. Connect the Sound Sensor to the bot.
Now, put your camera in the camera cage and position the arm that will press the button so that it is directly over the button, but not pressing down on it. In Figure 11-61 you can see that I ve got the small arm almost touching the camera button.
CHAPTER 11 SNAPSHOTBOT BUILD IT
Figure 11-61. The unwired SnapShotBot completed All that s left to do is wire it up and program it. Take another look at Figure 11-1 to see how I ve wired up the bot. Now that you ve completed your SnapShotBot, it s time to program it. 12 will walk you through the steps to program your little (or not-so-little) SnapShotBot so that it can enter the library, take a picture, circle around the basket, and let your team retrieve the key.
CHAPTER
SnapShotBot Program It
ou might think that programming the SnapShotBot is a little more involved than the previous bots. Although the program might be a little larger in size, the truth is that you re already experienced with all the programming blocks you ll need. For this chapter, I m going to walk you through the programming using a slightly different method. When I program my bots, many times I create the program in full and then upload it to my bot for testing. From there, I add and remove blocks as needed. Although this is perfectly fine for many bots, for a large program this might not be the best way to test your bot. If you find a mistake early in the program, it can cause you to have to delete other portions of your program. And if you find a really huge mistake, you might find yourself deleting the program completely and having to start over. So, let me show you another method for programming that involves building your program in small steps, uploading the program, then testing it. When you re done with this chapter, you should be able to decide for yourself when it might be beneficial to program in small steps or simply program the entire thing and then test and debug.
One Block at a Time
Get your SnapShotBot Design Journal page and open up the Lego Mindstorms NXT software. Type SnapShotBot into the blank text field labeled Start New Program, then click the Go button (see Figure 12-1).
Figure 12-1. Enter SnapShotBot for the new program name and click Go.
Note To have more work space visible on your screen, close down the RoboCenter area on the far right
by clicking the small red X in the upper-right corner of the software.
In the SnapShotBot building instructions in 11, you might have noticed I placed the Touch Sensor on the back of the bot. I plan on using the Touch Sensor as a sort-of Start
CHAPTER 12 SNAPSHOTBOT PROGRAM IT
button for my bot to get rolling. So, the first item you ll place in your program will be a simple LOOP block (see Figure 12-2) that waits for the Touch Sensor to be triggered (pressed and then released). Once the sensor is triggered, the remaining program will begin. (You could use a WAIT block that breaks when the Touch Sensor is pressed, but I like to use the LOOP block because I can later add blocks inside the LOOP if I want the bot to perform some other actions while it s waiting.)
Figure 12-2. Use a LOOP block and Touch Sensor trigger to start the bot. Now you can start on the actual programming blocks needed for the bot to perform the actions in the Task List. Look at the Task List on your Design Journal page (turn back to Figure 10-3). Our first task is Move forward to the center of room and stop. If you ll think back to 10, we determined that to get halfway across the room, we needed to program our motors to spin for ten rotations. Each rotation moves the bot approximately seven inches, so when the motors spin for ten rotations, the bot will move forward approximately seventy inches, or almost six feet. That ll be good enough to get the bot near the center of the room. Place a MOVE block and configure it with a Duration of ten rotations for motors B and C. Be aware that I ve selected the direction for motors B and C as the down arrow (see Figure 12-3). This is because the motors are reversed on my design facing away from the back of the bot. Because of this, forward motion for the bot means having these motors spin in the reverse direction. If your bot differs, configure your motor directions based on your own design.
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