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There are many distinctions in the types of stocks one can purchase One of the biggest is between large and small stocks The terms large and small refer to the size of the company you re investing in, not the price of the stock itself
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You can have a large stock trading for $5 a share and a small stock trading for more than $100 a pop Speci cally, the terms large and small refer to the market value, or market capitalization, of the underlying company, as discussed earlier in the book You ll recall that the way to calculate a company s market cap which is the dollar value investors collectively place on a stock (not to be confused with its book value) is to take its current stock price and multiply that by the total number of shares the company has outstanding So, a company could be trading at $5 a share, but if it has 10 billion shares outstanding, it would have a market cap of $50 billion, which would clearly make it a large stock Conversely, a company could be trading at $100 a share, but if it only has 1 million shares outstanding, it would still be a small-cap stock with a market cap of $100 million Generally speaking, large stocks are those with market caps of above $10 billion These are companies typically found in various large stock indexes like the S&P 500 index of blue chip stocks, the Russell 1000 index, or even the Dow Jones Industrial Average (the Dow, however, only consists of 30 companies and is not as comprehensive as the S&P 500 or the Russell 1000) Meanwhile, small stocks are those with market caps of under $1 billion Major stock indexes that track small stocks include the Russell 2000 index of small stocks and the S&P 600 index Within the universe of small-cap stocks, there is a subset of even smaller stocks referred to as micro-cap stocks, which are shares of companies valued by the market at around $250 million or less These stocks can be found in the Wilshire micro-cap index In between large and small stocks there is another classi cation, called midcap stocks, examples of which are found in the S&P 400 mid-cap index While this is a meaningful category of equities to consider since mid caps o er some of the safety and stability of large caps but also some of the growth potential of small stocks nancial planners generally recommend that investors start o by diversifying rst between large and small, to obtain some balance in one s overall portfolio This is because large stocks and small stocks have historically acted so di erently (Figure 5-5) When you re investing in a small stock, you are making an entirely di erent wager than an investor purchasing a large blue chip stock Small-cap stocks are often shares of relatively young companies that are just getting started Or these companies may have been around for some time, but for some reason the market has not come around to recognizing their full growth potential Either way, when you re investing in small companies, you re investing in potential This means that your investment could potentially grow into something huge, or that potential could zzle out Ironically, both the risks and rewards are very large when it comes to small-cap stock investing This
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Annual Returns: Small vs Large Stocks*
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Year 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994
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Small Stocks 4389% 2080% 139% 514% 3644% 022% 2271% 2089% 3048% 142%
Large Stocks 2749% 2063% 881% 140% 1458% 1777% 2764% 2082% 3334% 084%
*As measured by performance of large stock funds and small stock funds
would explain why a diversi ed basket of small stocks has actually outperformed blue chips over long periods of time According to Ibbotson Associates, small stocks have gained 127 percent on average between 1926 and 2003, while large caps have returned 104 percent But the risks you face as a small-cap stock investor can be considerable For starters, large stocks tend to be followed by dozens, if not hundreds, of Wall Street analysts who work for the major research and brokerage houses Moreover, they are tracked closely by hundreds if not thousands of di erent money managers who either invest in these stocks or consider putting their money into them This means that large stocks tend to be relatively well followed and that their nancial situation is therefore relatively transparent It would be di cult for a large stock to surprise investors with any unexpected news, since word of day-to-day developments ows through the analyst community Small stocks, on the other hand, may have only one or two analysts on Wall Street who really follow them on a day-to-day basis And instead of thousands of money managers keeping tabs on them, it may be more like dozens While small stocks must report their nancial status to investors and federal regulators the same way that large stocks do, there are fewer professionals on Wall Street paying attention, so the potential for key bits of surprising news slipping through the cracks is higher There s a theory in stock investing, the e cient market theory, that says the stock market itself is ultimately rational and e cient This theory states that one of the reasons why it s so di cult for professional managers to beat the major indexes is that stock prices fully re ect the sum total of all the relevant
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