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The ext3 file system maintains full metadata recovery support (directory tree recovery), but it offers various levels of file data recovery In effect, you are trading off less file data recovery for more speed The ext3 file system supports three options: writeback, ordered, and journal The default is writeback The writeback option provides only metadata recovery, no file data recovery The ordered option supports limited file data recovery, and the journal option provides for full file data recovery Any files in the process of being changed during a crash will be recovered To specify a ext3 option, use the data option in the mount command
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Though journaling is often used to recover from disk crashes, a journal-based file system can do much more The ext3, JFS, and XFS file systems only provide the logging operations used in recovery, whereas ReiserFS uses journaling techniques to completely rework file system operations In ReiserFS, journaling is used to read and write data, abandoning the block structure used in traditional Unix and Linux systems This gives it the capability to access a large number of small files very quickly, as well as use only the amount of disk space they need However, efficiency is not that much better with larger files
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File systems are mounted using the mount command, described in the next section Although you can mount a file system directly with only a mount command, you can simplify the process by placing mount information in the /etc/fstab configuration file Using entries in this file, you can have certain file systems automatically mounted whenever your system boots For others, you can specify configuration information, such as mountpoints and access permissions, which can be automatically used whenever you mount a file system You needn t enter this information as arguments to a mount command as you otherwise must This feature is what allows mount utilities on GNOME or KDE to enable you to mount a file system simply by clicking a window icon All the mount information is already in the /etc/fstab file For example, when you add a new hard disk partition to your Linux system, you most likely want to have it automatically mounted on startup, and then unmounted when you shut down Otherwise, you must mount and unmount the partition explicitly each time you boot up and shut down your system
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To have Linux automatically mount the file system on your new hard disk partition, you need to add only its name to the fstab file, except in the case of removable devices like CD-ROMs and USB printers Removable devices are managed by HAL, using the storage policy files located in /usr/share/hal/fdi and /etc/hal/fdi directories The devices are automatically detected by the haldaemon service, and are managed directly by HAL using its set of storage callouts, such as hal-system-storage-mount to mount a device or hal-system-storage-eject to remove one In effect you now have to use the HAL device information files to manage your removable file systems If you want different options set for the device, you should create your own storage-methodsfdi file in the 30user directory The configuration is implemented using the XML language Check the default storage file in 10osvendors/20-storage-methodsfdi as well as samples in /usr/share/doc/halversion/conf directory See 31 for examples of using HAL to set device options
fstab Fields
An entry in an fstab file contains several fields, each separated from the next by a space or tab These are described as the device, mountpoint, file system type, options, dump, and fsck fields, arranged in the sequence shown here:
<device> <mountpoint> <filesystemtype> <options> <dump> <fsck>
The first field is the name of the file system to be mounted This entry can be either a device name or an ext2 or ext3 file system label A device name usually begins with /dev, such as /dev/hda3 for the third hard disk partition A label is specified by assigning the label name to the tag LABEL, as in LABEL=/ for an ext2 root partition The next field is the directory in your file structure where you want the file system on this device to be attached The third field is the type of file system being mounted Table 29-7 provides a list of all the different types you can mount The type for a standard Linux hard disk partition is ext3 The next example shows an entry for the main Linux hard disk partition This entry is mounted at the root directory, /, and has a file type of ext3:
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