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Like /proc, the /sys directory resides only in memory, but it is still mounted in the /etc/fstab file
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none /sys sysfs defaults 0 0
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File /proc/devices /proc/dma /proc/interrupts /proc/ioports /proc/pci /proc/asound /proc/ide /proc/net
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Description Lists the device drivers configured for the currently running kernel Displays the DMA channels currently used Displays the IRQs (interrupts) in use Shows the I/O ports in use Lists PCI devices Lists sound devices Directory for IDE devices Directory for network devices
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PART VII PART I PART I PART I PART I PART I PART I
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TABLE 31-2 /proc Device Information Files
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The /proc file system (see 29) is an older file system that was used to maintain information about kernel processes, including devices It maintains special information files for your devices, though many of these are now supported by the sysfs file system The /proc/devices file lists your installed character and block devices along with their major numbers IRQs, DMAs, and I/O ports currently used for devices are listed in the interrupts, dma, and ioports files, respectively Certain files list information covering several devices, such as pci, which lists all your PCI devices, and sound, which lists all your sound devices The sound file lists detailed information about your sound card Several subdirectories, such as net, ide, and scsi, contain information files for different devices Certain files hold configuration information that can be changed dynamically, such as the IP packet forwarding capability and the maximum number of files You can change these values with the sysctl tool (Kernel Tuning in the System Tools menu) or by manually editing certain files Table 31-2 lists several device-related /proc files
udev: Device Files
Devices are now hotpluggable, meaning they can be easily attached and removed Their configuration is dynamically detected and does not rely on manual administrative settings The hotplug tool used to detect device files is udev, user devices Each time your system is booted, udev automatically detects your devices and generates device files for them in the /etc/dev directory This means that the /etc/dev directory and its files are recreated each time you boot It is a dynamic directory, no longer static udev uses a set of rules to direct how device files are to be generated, including any corresponding symbolic links These are located in the /etc/udev/rulesd file You can find out more about udev at kernelorg/pub/ linux/utils/kernel/hotplug/udevhtml As part of the hotplug system, udev will automatically detect kernel devices that are added or removed from the system When the device interface is first created, its corresponding sysfs file is located and read, determining any additional attributes such as serial numbers and device major and minor numbers that can be used to uniquely identify
Part VII:
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the device These can be used as keys in udev rules to create the device interface Once the device is created, it is listed in the udev database, which keeps track of currently installed devices If a device is added, udev is called by hotplug It checks the sysfs file for that device for the major and minor numbers, if provided It then uses the rules in its rules file to create the device file and any symbolic links to create the device file in /dev, with permissions specified for the device in the udev permissions rules Once the device file is created, udev runs the programs in /etc/devd
NOTE When the system starts, it invokes /sbin/udevstart, which runs udev and creates all the
kernel devices making device files in the /dev directory As /etc/dev is now dynamic, any changes you make manually to the /etc/dev directory will be lost when you reboot This includes the creation of any symbolic links such as /dev/ cdrom that many software applications use Instead, such symbolic links have to be configured in the udev rules files, located in the /etc/udev/rulesd directory Default rules are already in place for symbolic links, but you can create rules to add your own
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